mostraligabue
» » L.A. Requiem (Elvis Cole Novels (Prebound))

ePub L.A. Requiem (Elvis Cole Novels (Prebound)) download

by Robert Crais

ePub L.A. Requiem (Elvis Cole Novels (Prebound)) download
Author:
Robert Crais
ISBN13:
978-1417708338
ISBN:
1417708336
Language:
Publisher:
San Val (February 2000)
Category:
Subcategory:
Mystery
ePub file:
1495 kb
Fb2 file:
1160 kb
Other formats:
mbr rtf docx lrf
Rating:
4.4
Votes:
652

The Writing: Robert Crais has said in interviews that his best writing of the Elvis Cole/Joe Pike series began with this novel, .

view Kindle eBook view Audible audiobook. The Writing: Robert Crais has said in interviews that his best writing of the Elvis Cole/Joe Pike series began with this novel, . Requiem, which is number eight in the series of sixteen. Since I thoroughly enjoyed thru I was interested to see what Crais would do differently in this novel as compared to the previous ones.

Note: The year of each novel’s original publication is in parenthesis next to the title. 1. The Monkey’s Raincoat (1987). Anthony Award winner.

The novels of Robert Crais have been published in 62 countries and are bestsellers around the world. Robert Crais received the Ross Macdonald Literary Award in 2006 and was named Grand Master by the Mystery Writers of America in 2014. Most of Crais' books feature the characters Elvis Cole and Joe Pike, with The Watchman (2007), The First Rule (2010) and The Sentry (2011) centering on Joe Pike. Taken is a 2012 detective novel by Robert Crais.

More praise for Robert Crais. Requiem Elvis Cole fans will love this latest page-turner featuring the fast-talking private eye and his taciturn tattooed partner. A milestone in the career of a very fine writer and a must-read for contemporary hardboiled fans. A hip, tightly crafted novel full of consistently drawn characters and more than a handful of surprises. There's nothing predictable here. The story is complex and realistic. Elvis Cole fans will love this latest page-turner featuring the fast-talking private eye and his taciturn tattooed partner.

"A hip, tightly crafted novel full of consistently drawn characters and more than a. .

should be mentioned in the same breath as Robert B. Parker, Tony Hillerman, Sue Grafton, and James Lee Burke. - Houston Chronicle. The best in the Elvis Cole/Joe Pike series to date. For Ed Waters and Sid Ellis, who taught more than words.

Even though the novel is narrated (mostly) by series lead Elvis Cole, this book is as much Pike's as it is his.

Robert Crais (Free Fall, Monkey's Raincoat) returns with his eighth Elvis Cole mystery, . Requiem, a breakneck caper that leaves the wise-cracking detective second-guessing himself. Cole's partner, the tight-lipped, charm-free Joe Pike, gets a call from his friend Frank "Tortilla" Garcia. Even though the novel is narrated (mostly) by series lead Elvis Cole, this book is as much Pike's as it is his.

Elvis Cole’s readership and fan base grew with each new book, then skyrocketed in 1999 upon the publication of L.The novels of Robert Crais have been published in 42 countries and are bestsellers around the world. A. Requiem, which was a New York Times and Los Angeles Times bestseller and forever changed the way Crais conceived of and structured his novels. In this new way of telling his stories, Crais combined the classic ‘first person’ narrative of the American detective novel with flashbacks, multiple story lines, multiple points-of-view, and literary elements to better illuminate his themes.

  • The Writing: Robert Crais has said in interviews that his best writing of the Elvis Cole/Joe Pike series began with this novel, L.A. Requiem, which is number eight in the series of sixteen. Since I thoroughly enjoyed #1 thru #7, I was interested to see what Crais would do differently in this novel as compared to the previous ones. The differences are easily identified. In this novel, Crais employs writing in multiple POVs (both first and third), whereas the previous seven were solely first person point of view. This blending of POVs, which James Patterson has been doing for ages, allows the writer to bring more depth to other characters in the story, especially the villain. The other most notable change is Crais’s abundant use of similes and metaphors. Almost as if Crais had taken a writing class in the power and use of similes and metaphors and decided to let loose with them in this episode. While I like the occasional simile and/or metaphor, when used too often, they tend to draw attention to the writing (and to the writer) rather than keeping the reader focused on the story. While this may be considered by some to represent a more sophisticated style of writing, I’m not a fan when such use draws attention to the writing/writer.

    The Storytelling: As usual, the storytelling is wonderful. Robert Crais knows how to show and tell a story.

    The Plot: Great plot. Great mystery. Great story logic. But with one small plot/logic problem: Chapter 35: With all of Sobek’s windows covered with plastic, a smart cop would not have been so capricious to enter the building without being very, very careful and figuring out what Sobek was trying to hide. Dolan was a smart cop, but then she did the stupid thing. I realize that it was convenient for the story and the romantic subplots to have Dolan die, but it just didn’t make sense that she would be so careless.

    The Characters: The characterizations were very well drawn, except for Samantha Dolan. Dolan was continually presented as a really good cop, and a victim to unfortunate circumstances. Yes, she had a chip on her shoulder, and yes, she was ambitious, but in order to set up her unfortunate death, she also had to be portrayed as emotionally uncontrollable and susceptible to rash behavior. Those two just didn’t meet my logic test. A great cop, with years of experience, would not make an emotionally charged decision that could put her own life at risk and the lives of others. I thought Dolan was not a believable characters as Crais presented her.

    The Ending: Totally unpredictable until the very end, but then very so-so ho-humm.

    The Narration: Very good. Ron McLarty's voice worked very well for this story.

    Summary: This novel is the 8th episode in the Elvis Cole/Joe Pike series and it is probably the very best of the eight, mainly because of the use of multiple POVs which allows more characters to take shape.

  • My opinion...Robert Crais may not be in the "famous"spotlight", but the man can write. L.A. Requiem is a study of life, death and cruel lies...populated by facinating and truly "different" characters. Elvis Cole, former Ranger and special ops veteran is the boss man...partnered with Joe Pike, a quiet, strong veteran of the ugly war in Nam. Love them, hate them or find them intolerable...the detective outfit they run is a dead, solid perfect description of the private investigation business as opposed to bureaucratic, ponderous police operations that are loaded with 'bad guy"s looking to move up the ladder and get out of the squad cars. The story has sadness, love, hate, major surprises and is an outright page turner. Overall, reading about Elvis Cole and Joe Pike is time well spent, and an example of writing that was a pleasure for the author. The reader may count on this story and the setting in the Los Angeles basin, which Crais describes to perfection.

  • From the first page, I was compelled to read through this novel. The author's style was true and concise to the story. Regarding all the italics, however, per his backstories . . . dear, Lord, don't do that! Italics should only be used for internal thoughts, limited emphasis, and titles of published work. It took me a while to get my eyes tilted back to the left. :)
    The characters were believable and easy to visualize. Joe Pike seemed a little too stony and God-like, though, and Krantz was too much of pissant secondary bad guy. The story would've been better served if the Pike had more personality. It was hard to like the guy. Other than his forbidden love for his partner's wife he seemed not to have many human attributes.
    The Los Angeles setting was well done and precisely the LA Basin I know and have lived in for most of my life. The last chapter was unnecessary; seemed to be a segue into another book.

  • Reading the first 7 Elvis Cole books, I had gotten into that enjoyable easy groove, reading about familiar characters as they deal with all of the plots twists in Crais' well-written novels. "L.A. Requiem" blasted me out of that groove and took me on a ride that might be just about the best I've taken in this genre. His insights into the life and mind of Joe Pike are fascinating and revealing; Joe Pike is even deeper that I thought he was. When he gets in trouble, and when he almost dies, the sentiments of his friend Elvis Cole nearly brought a tear to my eye. And Crais uses a very interesting technique that I've never seen before. He gradually reveals the perpetrator to us in a series of first-person accounts, paralleling the discoveries of Cole and the police. Crais also uses flashbacks to great advantage to give us perspective on what happening now.

    I would rate this as one of the best! I truly enjoyed it, and so will you. Get it today!