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ePub Death's Little Helpers (John March Mysteries) download

by Nick Sullivan,Peter Spiegelman

ePub Death's Little Helpers (John March Mysteries) download
Author:
Nick Sullivan,Peter Spiegelman
ISBN13:
978-0792736936
ISBN:
0792736931
Language:
Publisher:
Chivers Sound Library; Unabridged edition (July 1, 2005)
Category:
Subcategory:
Mystery
ePub file:
1172 kb
Fb2 file:
1478 kb
Other formats:
rtf doc mobi mbr
Rating:
4.7
Votes:
982

Death's Little Helpers book.

Death's Little Helpers book. In this masterful follow-up to Peter Spiegelman’s stunning debut Black Maps, private investigator John March finds himself drawn into a web of corruption that extends from the halls of high finance to the dark underworld of organized crime. Gregory Danes, a Wall Street analyst has gone missing, and his ex-wife, a fashionable painter, calls March to track him down.

DEATH'S LITTLE HELPERS is the second book in the John March detective series following Mr. Spiegelman's debut novel, BLACK MAPS. John March has a trust fund from Klein & Sons, the financial institution in New York City that is owned and managed by his uncles and siblings

DEATH'S LITTLE HELPERS is the second book in the John March detective series following Mr. John March has a trust fund from Klein & Sons, the financial institution in New York City that is owned and managed by his uncles and siblings. John is the family disappointment. Instead of being a banker, he went upstate to be a deputy sheriff for several years and then returned to the city to be a one-man PI agency.

Читать онлайн Death's little helpers. Deputy John March, huh? Get out of Dodge by sundown and all that? Just like that.

Peter Spiegelman Death's Little Helpers 1 As a husband, he was a lying, selfish prick, Nina Sachs said, and lit yet another cigarette. Her silver lighter caught the late-April sun as it came through the big windows. She flicked a strand of auburn hair away from her face and blew a plume of smoke at the high ceiling. And as a father, he’s no better. But he’s our meal ticket, Billy’s and mine, and if someth. Читать онлайн Death's little helpers. Death's Little Helpers.

Deaths little helpers, . Death's Little Helpers, . To Jay Butterman and Stewart Rothman, for technical advice, local color, and directions to Surrogate’s Court (any errors in the nuts and bolts are mine, and mine alone).

Items related to Death's Little Helpers (John March Mysteries . Peter Spiegelman is the author of Black Maps.

Items related to Death's Little Helpers (John March Mysteries (Paperback). Spiegelman, Peter Death's Little Helpers (John March Mysteries (Paperback)). He worked on Wall Street for twenty years developing software systems for international banking institutions and retired in 2001 to devote himself to writing. He lives in Connecticut. In this masterful follow-up to Peter Spiegelman's stunning debut Black Maps, private investigator John March finds himself drawn into a web of corruption that extends from the halls of high finance to the dark underworld of organized crime.

In this masterful follow-up to Peter Spiegelman s stunning debut "Black Maps," private investigator John March finds himself drawn into a web of corruption that extends from the halls of high finance to the dark underworld of organized crime.

In this masterful follow-up to Peter Spiegelman’s stunning debut Black Maps, private investigator John March finds himself . Death's Little Helpers (John March Mysteries).

In this masterful follow-up to Peter Spiegelman’s stunning debut Black Maps, private investigator John March finds himself drawn into a web of corruption that extends from the halls of high finance to the dark underworld of organized crime. Spiegelman's debut, Black Maps, introduced John March, former upstate sheriff's NYC private eye. Here March, who's been in self-imposed isolation since the murder of his wife.

Peter Spiegelman (born 1958) is an American crime fiction author and former Wall Street executive. He is most known for his series of books following the cases of the Manhattan-based private eye, John March, winning a Shamus Award for the first novel in the series. He lives with his family in Connecticut

Private eye John March follows the money again in a worthy sequel to his impressive debut (Shamus-winner Black Maps, 2003). Unlike the s-McDonald prototype, March is rich, bulwarked by a trust fund from the family banking business.

Private eye John March follows the money again in a worthy sequel to his impressive debut (Shamus-winner Black Maps, 2003). Still, he is (in Chandler's famous phrase) neither tarnished nor afraid, though prone to those heavy bouts of Weltschmerz endemic to fictional . March’s mean street is Wall Street, and he walks it like a beat cop, which explains why Nina Sachs dials his number when her financial analyst ex-husband, Gregory Danes, goes missing.

Hired to find missing Wall Street analyst Gregory Danes, private detective John March uncovers a deadly web of financial deception as his investigation leads him through the corrupt inner workings of the financial world.
  • One of the great strengths of Spiegelman's first book, Black Maps, was that it showed just how well the author understood the workings of Wall Street and could weave it into a compelling plot accessible to the layman.

    Although this second book in the series also involves a prominent Wall Street figure, the emphasis is far less on the financial crime and more on what happens when a member of the family disappears without explanation.

    The novel is paced well, more evenly than the first book. March's love interest is realized finally in this novel and the chemistry between the characters is much better. Spiegelman also allows the action to spill out of New York City, and his portrays of rural massachsetts ring true to those of us who know the area.

    I was concerned that Spiegelman would stay in a Wall Street rut after the success of Black Maps. Thanksfully, he took a chance and the readers will reap the benefit.

  • While some reviewers here lament what they think was a slow and aimless plot, I found this book to be well-done, fascinating and riveting. It's refreshing to occasionally read a thriller that is not slam-bang, unrealistic violence and action on every page. This is a well-thought-out, well crafted piece of work that moves strongly forward. The characters are well-defined, the place descriptions (mostly New York)are vivid and real and human interplay between the good guy and possible bad guys is compelling. All of which leads me to my opinion that Spiegelman is truly a master of the genre. In other words, I thoroughly enjoyed this book and look forward to reading many more Spiegelman sparklers.

  • Plenty of twists and turns and the financial background Peter Spiegelman puts into his novels is great. Ironically I think I work in one of the buildings he described in the book. OK I understand it had some differences but easily it is our building, and yes it is a bank. Anyways if you like the John March books you will like this one too.

  • I was looking forward to this book, having loved "Black Maps". But I had a hard time finishing it.

    First, I found March to be seriously irritating. Despite his constant movement, he struck me as basically passive; I kept wanting to say something like "get over it". Of course, this criticism is also a testimonial at how well Mr. Spiegelman delineated his character, I lose interest in a well written character who makes me impatient. The same can be said for March's girlfriend, Jane. Moving on...March's client is so dislikeable that I was constantly wondering why March was still working on the project, even after she fires him AND he understands that the case may be endangering people dear to him (I understand persistence, but to continue when your loved ones are threatened with physical harm, and the case is hardly of earthshattering importance anyway?) One of the consequences for me of this disbelief and irritation was that I didn't care who or what was responsible - I just lost interest. Some of this may also be attributable to the fact that the usual clue to clue journey of the detective structure was mostly missing. Instead, it was a lot of dead ends and a Big Revelation.

  • This review is for the First Vintage Crime/Black Lizard softcover edition, June 2006, 337 pages. DEATH'S LITTLE HELPERS is the second book in the John March detective series following Mr. Spiegelman's debut novel, BLACK MAPS.

    John March has a trust fund from Klein & Sons, the financial institution in New York City that is owned and managed by his uncles and siblings. John is the family disappointment. Instead of being a banker, he went upstate to be a deputy sheriff for several years and then returned to the city to be a one-man PI agency.

    John's only client in this story is Nina Sachs, who lives in a NYC loft with her twelve year old son ann Ines, her lesbian partner of Spanish origin. Ines owns three art galleries and Nina is a rather successful painter. Nevertheless, Nina depends on alimony and child support payments from her ex, Gregory Danes, and Greg has gone missing.

    Danes is a wealthy security analyst who was a hot shot in the nineties before his ego got him in trouble. Although he is struggling to recoup his reputation, he suddenly takes a three week vacation from which he has not returned. Nina hires John to find him.

    John soon learns that Danes, with his abrasive personality, has few friends, not even a current girlfriend, but there are many disgruntled investors and associates. Some are anxious to contact Danes while others hope he never returns. After a couple days on the case, John discovers someone else is intently looking for Danes and they seem to be several steps ahead of him.

    Before becoming an author, Peter Spiegelman worked for over twenty years in financial services in New York City. He deftly sketches the changing dynamics of the dot.com securities boom and bust and then draws recognizable character types in a clear and reasonable plot. John March's rational and methodical sleuthing, and his reliance on subcontracted investigators, also helps to make the story believable.

    The Amazon.com review mentions that the author "occasionally over-describes his scenes." I'd say he ALWAYS over-describes them. I learned to speed read through settings until the story resumed. Otherwise, it is well written. There is not much blood and violence or abrupt plot twists and turns, even at the end. This is not a thriller. DEATH'S LITTLE HELPERS is mystery suspense at its best.

  • he gets his subject matter, good character development, understands the tumult of some families, I am now a fan of his