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ePub A Twist at The End download

by Steven Saylor

ePub A Twist at The End download
Author:
Steven Saylor
ISBN13:
978-0312980665
ISBN:
0312980663
Language:
Publisher:
Minotaur Books; 1st edition (December 9, 2001)
Category:
Subcategory:
Mystery
ePub file:
1908 kb
Fb2 file:
1795 kb
Other formats:
rtf lrf mobi lrf
Rating:
4.6
Votes:
183

Steven Saylor’s ‘A Twist at the End: A Novel of O. Henry’ is a very well, and cleverly, written historical-fiction based on a real series of gruesome murders in Austin, Texas in the mid-1880s; at a time when a young William Sydney.

Steven Saylor’s ‘A Twist at the End: A Novel of O. Henry’ is a very well, and cleverly, written historical-fiction based on a real series of gruesome murders in Austin, Texas in the mid-1880s; at a time when a young William Sydney Porter-later to become famous as the master short-story writer, O. Henry-was a resident o. Steven Saylor’s ‘A Twist at the End: A Novel of O. Henry-was a resident of.

1 quote from A Twist at the End: ‘This is America, after all, where a man’s hygiene and sense of humor are more important than his pedigree. A Twist at the End Quotes Showing 1-1 of 1. This is America, after all, where a man’s hygiene and sense of humor are more important than his pedigree.

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Format: Unabridged Written by: Steven Saylor Release date: 6/9/2015 Duration: 20 hrs and .

It's all fascinating and provocative. Throughout, Saylor brings to bear his remarkable ability to evoke a vanished time.

A twist at the end. A Novel of O. Henry. Saylor is so generous in presenting every detail of these (mostly factual) subplots that few of his characters get much chance to shine; even Will himself is upstaged by the miscreants who can be most broadly drawn.

Written by Steven Saylor, narrated by J. D. Jackson. Best known for his acclaimed mystery fiction set in ancient Rome, in A Twist at the End Steven Saylor delivers a stunning historical novel about America's first recorded serial murders - the Austin, Texas, servant girl murders of 1885 - artfully blending real characters and true crime into an engrossing work of fiction. The city of Austin, Texas, "is fearfully dull", wrote young Will Porter to a friend in the spring of 1885, "except for the frequent raids of the Servant Girl Annihilators, who make things lively in the dead of night.

Saylor at the 2012 Texas Book Festival. Steven Saylor (born March 23, 1956) is an American author of historical novels. 1956-03-23) March 23, 1956 (age 63) Port Lavaca, Texas. He is a graduate of the University of Texas at Austin, where he studied history and classics. Saylor's best-known work is his Roma Sub Rosa historical mystery series, set in ancient Rome. Have You Seen Dawn? is a contemporary thriller set in a fictional Texas town, Amethyst, based on Saylor's hometown, Goldthwaite, Texas.

Austin, Texas, in 1885 is a place of dust and dreams, quick riches, and wild desires. But "the Servant girl Annihilators" are also making it a city of fear. The first victim, a mulatto housekeeper, is torn from her bed and murdered. Six more women will die, including pretty blond Eula Phillips, who is bank clerk's Will Porter's lover.

Steven Saylor is the author of the ROMA SUB ROSA series of historical mysteries featuring Gordianus the Finder, set . Outside the Roman books are two novels set in Steven's native Texas.

Steven Saylor is the author of the ROMA SUB ROSA series of historical mysteries featuring Gordianus the Finder, set in the ancient Rome of Cicero, Caesar, and Cleopatra. The latest book is THRONE OF CAESAR, in which Gordianus confronts the Ides of March, 44 . and the most famous murder case in history. A TWIST AT THE END is based on America's first recorded serial murders, which terrorized Austin, Texas in 1885. The chief protagonist is young Will Porter, who later became famous as O.

Austin, Texas, in 1885 is a place of dust and dreams, quick riches, and wild desires. But "the Servant girl Annihilators" are also making it a city of fear. The first victim, a mulatto housekeeper, is torn from her bed and murdered. Six more women will die, including pretty blond Eula Phillips, who is bank clerk's Will Porter's lover. Over a decade later, living in New York as O. Henry, Will cannot escape his memories--or a blackmailer's merciless demands. Then a mysterious letter invites him back to Texas to follow the dark path of a sadistic killer and make a stunning discover as he is forced to confront the demons of his own tormented mind...
  • I live in Austin, Texas so thoroughly enjoyed reading about my city back in 1885. I knew O'Henry lived in Austin but never knew he was here during the infamous Servant Girl Murders so learned a great deal about the murders and Austin in general. I now need to make an effort to visit the O'Henry and Elizabeth Ney museums. :-) The story itself was engaging but I felt the final chapter dragged a bit and the ending was far-fetched...although I realize fictional. Still overall a fun read and I would recommend -- especially to a fellow Austinite

  • I thought I might not enjoy this as much as Saylor's Roman novels, but it totally blew me away. Unlike some other reviewers here, I found it a riveting page-turner. I loved the Texas history, and the ending came as a stunning surprise.
    I'm puzzled by the Amazon.com reviewer's saying the opening featured a great twist, while the end didn't. For me, the title of the opening section made clear what was happening (and I can't believe Saylor didn't realize it would). As for the end, I'd considered several possible suspects--it helped that I didn't know which characters were real and which fictional. But I never foresaw the thrilling finale. I could see on a rereading that there had been clues, questions about this character; but then, just as Saylor intended, I'd been given so many other things to think about that I'd forgotten how odd the person was.
    My one small regret was learning from the Notes that some details and characters I had hoped were real were fictional. But I'm glad Saylor played fair with readers by telling us.

  • Book indeed has a Twist at the End. Story kept me on edge. Hard to put down. Story surrounds servant girl murders in Austin Texas. Excellent history of Austin at the turn of the century. Would recommend buying this book.

  • I am a huge fan of Steven Saylor and I own all of the books from his Roma Sub Rosa series. I was slightly disappointed in this book however. Usually, Saylor keeps me guessing up until the last page of the book, but in this case I had the killer pinned halfway through the book! Saylor is still an excellent author, however, and this book should be of particular interests to Texans and all those who have visited the state's capitol. I was particularly fascinated by the history behind the book, and if you look, you can actually find the articles that Saylor references in his book.

  • I went to high school and college in Austin and am an O.Henry fan. This was the second time I've read the book -- a great read, doubly so because it is based on actual events in Austin and in O.Henry's life.

  • I loved the history of Austin and surrounding areas. I thought the author developed the characters very well. It was one of my favorite books!

  • I live in Austin and found that Saylor's description of events and characters was based on facts and actual events. The mysterious men who traveled through Austin at the time of murders were fictitious, however. Although the mystery was never historically solved, Saylor's solution was quite remarkable.

  • This book was boring. It wasn't actually offensively boring, it just went on too long, was too dull, and could have been chopped quite effectively. It dragged. There was extraneous detail that makes one think of a teacher's pet, showing off. It just went on and on and on and then really arrived nowhere. The foreshadowing was not subtle. The sexual politics were rather annoying. It was a slog. I won't be trying any more of this author's books.