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ePub Seven Wonders download

by Nick Podehl,Adam Christopher

ePub Seven Wonders download
Author:
Nick Podehl,Adam Christopher
ISBN13:
978-1469208909
ISBN:
1469208903
Language:
Publisher:
Angry Robot on Brilliance Audio; Unabridged edition (August 28, 2012)
Category:
Subcategory:
Mystery
ePub file:
1640 kb
Fb2 file:
1919 kb
Other formats:
lrf lit azw lrf
Rating:
4.1
Votes:
655

Narrator Nick Podehl, By (author) Adam Christopher.

Narrator Nick Podehl, By (author) Adam Christopher. Free delivery worldwide.

Written by Adam Christopher. Narrated by Nick Podehl. Seven Wonders has a lot going for it. It harnesses a take-no-prisoners plot (involving superheroes, cosmic power tools, tough-guy cops, and psychic alien threats) to a narrative a voice that both (1) pokes fun at the conventions of genre (ala Edlund's Tick comics but maybe with a shade more irony), and (2) that maintains a detached postmodern perspective while (3) never entirely losing the innocent.

by Adam Christopher First published January 1st 2012. Seven Wonders (Paperback). Published August 28th 2012 by Angry Robot. Nick Podehl (Goodreads Author) (Reading). ISBN: 1531882498 (ISBN13: 9781531882495). Paperback, 411 pages. Author(s): Adam Christopher (Goodreads Author). ISBN: 0857661965 (ISBN13: 9780857661968).

Narrated by Nick Podehl. Tony Prosdocimi lives in the bustling Metropolis of San Ventura-a city gripped in fear, a city under siege by the hooded supervillain.

Adam Christopher (Author), Nick Podehl (Narrator), Angry Robot on Brilliance Audio (Publisher). Maybe this book and my feelings toward it are clouded by Adam's first novel, Empire State, which I absolutely loved. Get this audiobook plus a second, free. Is there a chance that I went into this novel expecting the same level of originality and awesome that was Empire State? Maybe. I think the important thing to remember is that Seven Wonders was actually written before Empire State and maybe that has something to do with the perceived drop in quality between books.

Nick Podehl is a professional Voice Actor . Christopher Morgan Lee Stone. 23 September at 15:50.

They had it all there, no problem. Is there a problem, captain?". Sam's eyes roved the table top.

By Adam Christopher Illustrated by Will Staehle. Tony Prosdocimi lives in the bustling Metropolis of San Ventura – a city gripped in fear, a city under siege by the hooded supervillain, The Cowl. By Adam Christopher Illustrated by Will Staehle. Category: Science Fiction & Fantasy Noir Mysteries. When Tony develops super-powers and acts to take down The Cowl, however, he finds that the local superhero team Seven Wonders aren’t as grateful as he assumed they’d b. ile Under: Science Fiction.

Tony Prosdocimi lives in the bustling Metropolis of San Ventura—a city gripped in fear, a city under siege by the hooded supervillain, The Cowl. When Tony develops super-powers and acts to take down The Cowl, however, he finds that the local superhero team Seven Wonders aren’t as grateful as he assumed they’d be.…
  • If you care at all about good writing, don't buy into the hype after reading all the good reviews for this book. There are just way too many problems, so unless you can shut off your brain completely and just enjoy the moderately well-done action sequences (and even those get progressively worse as the story goes on), you won't walk away from this feeling satisfied. Here's a quick list of some of the things that rubbed me the wrong way while I was reading this.

    - The characters all have the same voice. Whether they are the mayor of the city, the leader of the Seven Wonders, a young kid working retail, or chief of police, they all sort of sound like some kid who dropped out of college after partying too much. This is exacerbated by the fact that in the beginning of the book--the only place where any character development occurs--the characters all keep hanging out at bars and drinking at parties.

    - Many of the main characters have no discernible personality whatsoever. I was half way through the book before I could tell half of the Seven Wonders apart, and in a world of colorful superheroes, I should probably be able to tell you what color the costume was of more than three characters after finishing the book, but nope. In just about any scene in the book, you could shuffle around all the names and it wouldn't impact the story in any way.

    - There are a TON of subplots that go absolutely nowhere. For example, there are a couple of characters whose main motivation is that The Cowl, the initial supervillain of the book, killed their loved ones. Neither of those characters get any kind of resolution about that, even though even as far as three fourths of the way through the book, they were still mentioning their need for vengeance. Be ready for a lot of these plot lines. I think we're lucky that at least the main villain was dealt with.

    - While this is sort of an ensemble story, Tony is the first character we see in action, and one of the last, so you could kind of think of him as the main character. He's presented as a wannabe superhero in the beginning, but he goes through a wide range of roles throughout the story, at times being an actual superhero saving the world, other times being the ultimate evil, and at points in the middle reverting back to plain old Tony. But he is never convincing in ANY of these roles. He has that same "dudebro" fratboy college dropout voice and attitude through the entire story, all the way through to the final pages. It seemed like the author was honestly trying to make him be good or bad at points, but the character was just too stupid to do either one convincingly. It's probably not good when the guy who's supposed to be striking fear into the hearts of our heroes comes across like Stiffler from American Pie.

    - The technology and superpowers are wildly inconsistent. The origin of the characters' powers are never explained, and the powers they demonstrate in one part of the book don't necessarily match another. I was almost completely through the entire book before I realized the book's Flash analog (guy with superspeed) could fly. One of the pieces of technology that is critical to the story is depicted as functioning in a vastly different way in the beginning of the book than it does at the end. This may sound like nitpicking, but these are things that are central to the plot of the book, and there's just no logic to them at all.

    - The overall structure of the story is just weird. The story as described in the description on Amazon is really just a very long introduction that takes up half the book. Somewhere at around 60% on my Kindle, the story changed into a space opera and an entirely different villain was introduced. At that point, what little character development there was came grinding to a halt and it just turned into a series of fights. The fights don't really matter much though, because characters are killed and resurrected left and right (sometimes even in the same chapter), and at the end, the status quo is pretty much maintained.

    - The climactic space battle is one giant snore-fest. Because it takes place in space, there are no features in the environment to provide context or to interact with, and it's basically described as slow-moving energy passing back and forth. A couple hundred (literally) new characters are added and then killed off a couple pages later. This is no Mobile Suit Gundam or Star Wars. It is really hard to care about anything that happens in this battle.

    The only thing I kind of actually liked in this book, aside from a few well-written action sequences near the beginning, was The Cowl in the first half of the book. He is slowly losing his powers, and he doesn't understand why. Watching his giant ego deal with him going from basically immortal and having godlike powers to being just a normal person again was actually kind of interesting. It was much easier to sympathize with him during that process than anyone else in the entire book. Of course, at the halfway point, he's done with that whole process and turns into just another smug A-hole like everyone else.

    My advice to you is, if you're just looking for action, and you don't give a fart about throwing your money away, maybe you'll enjoy this. The action at the end is boring, but maybe you'll get enough out of the first half to enjoy it. If you actually want any kind of story, or characters who you might remember ten minutes after finishing the book, you'll definitely want to pass on this. It reads like the vanity project of a freshman in college.

  • Maybe this book and my feelings toward it are clouded by Adam's first novel, Empire State, which I absolutely loved. Is there a chance that I went into this novel expecting the same level of originality and awesome that was Empire State? Maybe.

    I think the important thing to remember is that Seven Wonders was actually written before Empire State and maybe that has something to do with the perceived drop in quality between books. Empire State was tight and controlled where Seven Wonders, while not meandering around, seemed to take longer to get to the point.

    What I liked?

    The world where superheroes exist and are always locked in a battle with the super villains. By the time the novel starts, there is only one group of superheroes left, the Seven Wonders, and one super villain, Cowl. There are still other superheroes out in the world but they have for the most part retired as they have defeated their villains.

    What I disliked?

    The first quarter to a third of a novel jumped around in time between present day and the past and it was difficult to keep track of the timing of the chapters and most of the beginnings of chapters was spent trying to figure out where it all fits in than enjoying what is actually happening.

    It felt as though every character was a POV character without actually settling on any character to be a consistent POV. It isn't a massive epic novel and yet it felt as though everyone was chipping into the story and you never spent long enough with anyone to get to know them or like them before the chapter ended and your flipped into someone else's head.

    The ultimate villain in the novel isn't even presented until about two thirds of the novel and then suddenly you're supposed to care about the struggle against them. The conflict stated off on a very small scale on being in San Ventura and then suddenly the whole world was involved and everyone had to pitch in. Like I said the ultimate villain was only introduced at about 67% and the whole novel was set up to be an intimate struggle before that was almost pushed to one side and an even bigger conflict was brought in.

    Will I read Adam Christopher's future novels?

    Absolutely. I'm looking forward to The Age Atomic next year.

  • Really pretty disappointing. As many others have noted, the plot wanders, complex motivations and characters change abruptly to suit the author's needs, and you end up getting ping-ponged between one nonsensical plot device and another. You get some fun in spotting the references to DC and Marvel universe characters and events. And in isolated cases, the writer shows a degree of flair and thoughtfulness in rendering the characters and their reactions/thoughts--but all of that is wasted on a very thin plot. All the more frustrating because the writer seems to be more intelligent than the material.

  • I read his last book and was disappointed that half way into it, the main plot of the book is reveled. In Seven Wonders, he does that again and while you may think that one story line has ended, in comes something else and it happens a few times in the book. I had to back up a few pages here and there just to figure out what was going on sometimes.

  • Want to know an author's nightmare (or at least one of them)? Picking up a novel so good that you read it to the exclusion of finishing writing one of your own. That makes Seven Wonders my nightmare.

    Well-written, well-paced, well-plotted. The story of Tony Prosdocimi and his interactions with Cowl, Blackbird and the Seven Wonders draws you in to a fascinating alternate reality where every city once had its own superheroes and supervillains. Sharp prose places you deep in the action and makes the city of San Ventura come alive. Adam is obviously a fan of the comic book genre, and while this book hasn't a single drawing, the tone is classic Golden Age comics. I won't touch on the plot fearing every comment might be a spoiler.

    Here's hoping there are more books from Adam set in this world he's created, just after my manuscript's deadline passes, please.