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ePub Death at the President's Lodging (Classic Crime) download

by Michael Innes

ePub Death at the President's Lodging (Classic Crime) download
Author:
Michael Innes
ISBN13:
978-0140105551
ISBN:
0140105557
Language:
Publisher:
Penguin Books (April 7, 1992)
Category:
Subcategory:
Mystery
ePub file:
1588 kb
Fb2 file:
1390 kb
Other formats:
docx lit doc azw
Rating:
4.1
Votes:
154

What struck me most about Death at the President's Lodging is that it is essentially . This is the first Inspector Appleby mystery by Michael Innes. I also wrote about Michael Innes in my Crime Fiction Alphabet series of posts – I is for Innes.

What struck me most about Death at the President's Lodging is that it is essentially a 'locked room' mystery. What struck me most about Death at the President’s Lodging is that it is essentially a ‘locked room’ mystery.

As he darkly remarked, he had not dine. nd Mr Gott was left to explain. Our whole story, said Gott, may now, I suppose, emerge

As he darkly remarked, he had not dine. Our whole story, said Gott, may now, I suppose, emerge. He and Campbell were always pretty thick, and Campbell was all for taking drastic measures against Umpleby.

Similar items to consider. Death at the President's lodging (Michael Innes - 1959) (ID:39418). Condition: Very Good. Michael innes death at the president's lodging 1958.

Death At The President's Lodging. Inspector Appleby is called to St Anthony's College, where the President has been murdered in his Lodging. Scandal abounds when it becomes clear that the only people with any motive to murder him are the only people who had the opportunity – because the President's Lodging opens off Orchard Ground, which is locked at night, and only the Fellows of the College have keys? To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

Other books in this series. Death at the President's Lodging.

Inspector Appleby is called to St Anthony's College, where the president has been murdered in his lodging. Scandal abounds when it becomes clear that the only people with any motive to murder him are the only people who had the opportunity-because the President's Lodging opens off Orchard Ground, which is locked at night, and only the Fellows of the College have keys. Legendary character Inspector John Appleby of Scotland Yard inspired a lasting vogue for donnish detective fiction. Other books in this series.

The year 1936 saw Innes as Professor of English at the University of Adelaide, during which tenure he wrote his first mystery story, 'Death at the President's Lodging'. With his second, 'Hamlet Revenge', Innes firmly established his reputation as a highly entertaining and cultivated writer. After the end of World War II, he returned to the UK and spent two years at Queen's University, Belfast, where in 1949 he wrote the 'Journeying Boy', a novel notable for the richly comedic use of an Irish setting.

Innes starts with an observation of Dr. Johnson & academic life puts one little in the way of extraordinary causalities" . Johnson & academic life puts one little in the way of extraordinary causalities", but the academics at St Anthony College and Inspector Appleby find them self immediate in the middle of it, with the murder of their president.

Michael Innes is a big name in golden age crime, although I. .

Michael Innes is a big name in golden age crime, although I have not read him before – and though I found this novel a bit slow to start, it held my interest enough, and I shall certainly explore more of his work in the future. Michael Innes is the pseudonym of J. J Stewart under which name he published several works of non-fiction as well as many novels and short stories. Quietly and a little ponderously written, Death at the President’s Lodging takes slow and careful reading, there is little in the way of action – and the interplay and dialogue between characters drives much of the mystery. An academic life, Dr Johnson observed, puts one little in the way of extraordinary casualties.

Inspector John Appleby has a difficult and delicate task when he investigates the murder of the unpopular Josiah Umpleby of St Anthony's College.
  • While I enjoy reading good descriptive prose, Mr. Innes' use of archaic and pedantic language, as well as extremely verbose descriptions unfortunately bored me. I read the entire book because I wanted to know which person was the murderer. I pride myself somewhat on having a large vocabulary and read voraciously, but I constantly read words in this story that I've never read in 60 years. About two thirds through the book, editing failed for several sentences, including Appleby's name. By the end of the book when Appleby was revealing the murderer, I found myself skipping page after page of over-description. I dislike writing critical reviews but felt it necessary here, because the mystery itself is interesting.

  • This was definitely the most hilariously convoluted mystery I ever read. It is a must-read for anyone who has spent any time at all in academia. The preciousness of academic types, the backbiting, the mutual loathing--it's all here. And Innes' writing is very, very elevated. Here we have exquisitely crafted sentences which actually required me to haul out my dictionary a number of times. If you want a respite from idiocy and vulgarity, Innes is it.

    By the author of "It All Started with a Bicycle"

  • Not for everyone. Very British. Writing very high level, plots very intellectual and complex, Vocabulary very high.
    Innes is a great writer. I enjoyed the complexity. Some may not like the detail and find it pedantic.

    If you like intelligent British mysteries, you will enjoy.

    Main inspector very intelligent and witty

  • The best part of the book was in the first or so half. It felt like taking a ride in the narrator's brain. Then my brain became scrambled trying to keep track with all the times and characters whereabouts. The later part of the read seemed less intimate but necessary. Still in general it was a bit of a let down.

  • My favorite Inspector Appleby mysteries take place in an academic setting. This subset of his mystery novels is undoubtedly a byproduct of the many years that Michael Innes (whose real name was John Innes Mackintosh Stewart) spent laboring in the halls of academia. Among the seats of learning where he taught are Queen's University in Belfast, and the universities of Oxford, Adelaide, and Leeds.

    The author could not help but involve a legion of eccentric, pompous, and even murderous professors in the death of the president of St. Anthony's College (modeled after the colleges at Oxford University). Their academic spats and bumblings are a good part of what makes this book readable. Innes is wickedly funny when it comes to poking fun at the habits of his donnish colleagues and undergraduates.

    "Death at the President's Lodging" starts out as a locked room mystery where the only suspects are locked into the college grounds for the night. The president's body is found in his own library, but we gradually learn that the corpse was subject to a great deal of postmortem perambulation as his colleagues try to establish their own alibis and manufacture evidence that points to their academic enemies. Nothing is as it first seems, not even time of death.

    A trio of undergraduates provides the comic relief as they chase one of the suspects (supposedly at an archeological dig in the Middle East) across the English countryside and finally deliver him to Inspector Appleby in a large wicker clothes basket (shades of Falstaff!).

    As Inspector Appleby winds his way through the skeins of plot and counter-plot created by great intellects gone murderously askew, his intuition is played off against the rather unimaginative plodding of local Constable Dodd. Dodd is a bit of a dry stick compared to the irrepressible Appleby, who in his very first appearance in this mystery (published in 1936), is already showing signs of what his successor at Scotland Yard refers to as his 'waywardness.'

    Enjoy Inspector John Appleby's literary debut for the hijinks of the undergraduates, the plots and counter-plots of their devious professors, and the erudite style of their donnish creator. The plot is overly complex, but it is brilliantly resolved and a lot of fun to read.

  • This one was a bit deceptive because I thought it was about murder in the White House. Nope. It's about the President of a British University - in a supposedly locked room. Gets a bit stodgy.

  • Great read. Not a cozy mystery. A convoluted one!
    Written in Agatha Christie's time but still entertaining today.
    Interesting look at the English college system.

  • Excellent reader, very complex plotting which was somewhat difficult to follow at times. I'm happy I read it and felt disappointed it wasn't "a Classic" as it was extremely well written.