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ePub When the Sacred Ginmill Closes download

by Lawrence Block

ePub When the Sacred Ginmill Closes download
Author:
Lawrence Block
ISBN13:
978-0877957744
ISBN:
0877957746
Language:
Publisher:
Arbor House Pub Co; First Edition edition (April 1, 1986)
Category:
Subcategory:
Mystery
ePub file:
1324 kb
Fb2 file:
1678 kb
Other formats:
lrf doc docx lrf
Rating:
4.5
Votes:
371

Home Lawrence Block When the Sacred Ginmill Closes. Billie locked up and the nurses staggered off into the night and the two of us went down to Miss Kitty's, and a little before four Skip closed up, too, and a handful of us went on down to Morrissey's.

Home Lawrence Block When the Sacred Ginmill Closes. When the Sacred Ginmill Closes, . Part of Matthew Scudder series by Lawrence Block. Morrissey's wouldn't close until nine or ten in the morning. The legal closing hour for bars in the city of New York is 4:00 A. M., an hour earlier on Saturday nights, but Morrissey's was an illegal establishment and was thus not bound by regulations of that sort.

When the Sacred Ginmill Closes is a Matthew Scudder novel, written by Lawrence Block

When the Sacred Ginmill Closes is a Matthew Scudder novel, written by Lawrence Block. Based on the short story "By the Dawn's Early Light", and published four years after Eight Million Ways to Die, this novel resurrected Block's interest in the character and led to his writing 10 more titles in the series. The book's title derives from the Dave Van Ronk song "Last Call".

And each man knows he'll be alone. When the sacred ginmill closes. The legal closing hour for bars in the city ofNew York is 4:00 . an hour earlier on Saturday nights, but Morrissey's was an illegal establishment and was thus not bound by regulations of that sort. It was one flight up from street level in one of a block of four-story brick houses onFifty-firstStreet between Eleventh and Twelfth Avenues. About a third of the houses on the block were abandoned, their windows boarded up or broken, some of their entrances closed off with concrete block.

Author : Lawrence Block. Series : Matthew Scudder Published : 1986. List Chapter or Page: 1. Page 1. 2. Page 2. 3. Page 3. 4. Page 4. 5. Page 5.

When the Sacred Ginmill Closes. Author: Lawrence Block. These were the dark days for Matthew Scudder. An ex- New York cop, he had drowned his career in booze. Now he was drinking away his life in a succession of seedy establishments that opened early and closed late, reduced to doing paid favors for the cronies who gathered with him to worship the bottle.

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When the Sacred Gin Mill Closes is like this. Chapter twelve opens in a drab, samey manner (just like its preceding sibling chapters) with our man Scud drinking his way through the three simultaneous mysteries he is attempting to solve. After ensuring one of his clients gets home safely after a hard and depressing night on the booze, he leaves his own apartment at some insane hour and finds himself drinking bourbon at Armstrong's. In it, Scudder begins to realize just how much drinking is controlling his life and affecting his work.

I called Syosset first, talked with Anita and the boys. I talked with her about money, saying I'd collected a fee and would be sending some soon. I talked with her about money, saying I'd collected a fee and would be sending some soon amp they'd be goingto soon. I called Skip at Miss Kitty's. Someone else answered the phone and I held while they summoned him. "I want to get together with you," he said. You want to come by afterward?".

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Already at work on two dangerous cases, Matthew Scudder, the down-and-out, hard-drinking ex-cop, becomes personally involved when the wife of a friend is brutally murdered
  • I first read the Lawrence Block novel A WALK AMONG THE TOMBSTONES prior to seeing the movie. Movies made from well written novels tend to be letdowns. While the movie did have its bright spots, it has to be extremely difficult to condense such an intriguing story into a 114 minute motion picture.

    This particular episode in the Matthew Scudder series takes place in New York City in 1975. Matt Scudder is a former Special Forces hero, an ex NYC cop, and a current and committed drinker who does favors for friends in exchange for money. Even though he and his friends spend most days and nights drinking heavily, none of them considers themselves to be alcoholics. All of them profess to be able to stop drinking at the drop of a hat, but somehow that never seems to happen. They just sort of stumble around together in sort of a "groundhog day", chasing their next drink and not much else.

    Unfortunately (and surprisingly) a few of his friends get themselves into difficult situations, and Matt finds himself collecting three different paychecks while looking for answers. He is the type of (unlicensed) private eye who walks in circles and gathers countless bits of information until he hits that "Eureka" moment where everything falls together. Sometimes the smallest piece of information.....

    Matt has his hands full with these cases and not everyone is who they seem to be. The problem is figuring out who is responsible for each crime and then extracting retribution without involving the local coppers. Not surprisingly, the Irish have their own way of balancing the scales. Innovative, tricky and effective.

  • This book opens with a bang. Literally. Matthew Scudder is sitting with some buddies in early July when a large explosion shatters the conversational tranquility that is enveloping the place and before peace is returned in full, the bar is held up and a small fortune is taken. Eventually (three chapters in) Matt agrees to take the job of finding out whodunit, and the whydunit, but before he makes much progress, the wife of a friend of a friend is killed and once more the task of finding the killer falls in the lap of our hero.

    Some books contain a chapter or a phrase that is so extraordinary and so beautiful that it lifts the work above the realm of the ordinary and into the space or territory of the mythical. When the Sacred Gin Mill Closes is like this. Chapter twelve opens in a drab, samey manner (just like its preceding sibling chapters) with our man Scud drinking his way through the three simultaneous mysteries he is attempting to solve. After ensuring one of his clients gets home safely after a hard and depressing night on the booze, he leaves his own apartment at some insane hour and finds himself drinking bourbon at Armstrong's. Conversation with the owner takes precedence over drinking and before Scudder knows it, he is (we are) experiencing and learning about the heart-breakingly beautiful paralytic dancers from Dave Van Ronk's mournful jazz masterpiece, "When the sacred Gin Mill closes". I won't infringe copyright by quoting the text here but rest assured this section of the book is worth the cost of admission alone.

    Back in the real world, days after the first listen, Scudder is helping his buddies solve a minor problem of extortion, and the song is still playing on his mind. Just like mine. And yours, too, when you read it. But this book is about more than Dave Van Ronk and his music. It is about friendship, and booze, and keeping your promises. And it is also about Ireland, and family, and home, and tradition.

    But most importantly, it is about truth, and how beauty can be found in the most unlikely and unexpected of places. So hang in there. Just like Matt does.

  • Having read most of the Matthew Scudder mysteries, I believe I would rate this one at the top. Two robberies and a murder/robbery all come to Matt's attention, but he's far in the bottle and not willing to sober up long enough to see them through. He has his moments of clarity when he is able to figure out the crucial pieces of the puzzle. There is a sadness that pervades Scudder's life and the lives of those around as they move from one gin joint to another. But that life fades as redemption is found.