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ePub Barefoot on Baker Street download

by Charlotte Anne Walters

ePub Barefoot on Baker Street download
Author:
Charlotte Anne Walters
ISBN13:
978-1780920122
ISBN:
1780920121
Language:
Publisher:
MX Publishing (September 20, 2011)
Category:
Subcategory:
Mystery
ePub file:
1880 kb
Fb2 file:
1877 kb
Other formats:
lrf mbr lrf azw
Rating:
4.4
Votes:
552

Barefoot on Baker Street is set in late Victorian London where a life of crime is the only way to escape poverty and servitude for one bright young workhouse orphan

Barefoot on Baker Street is set in late Victorian London where a life of crime is the only way to escape poverty and servitude for one bright young workhouse orphan. The narrative follows Red on her incredible life-journey as it twists and turns through poverty, riches, infatuation, loss and love.

Charlotte Walter's book "Barefoot on Bakerstreet" tells the story of Red, a never before documented love interest of Sherlock Holmes (and ultimately Watson's) life. There are no new mysteries that are introduced or deduced. Ms Walter's re-tells existing Sherlock Holmes published stories with the Red storyline woven throughout. I am a HUGE Sherlock Holmes fan, and I can be a little snobby and "purist" about how I like my Sherlock Holmes

Barefoot On Baker Street book. Barefoot on Baker Street is set in late Victorian London where a life of crime is the only way to escape poverty and servitude for one bright young workhouse orphan.

Barefoot On Baker Street book.

Barefoot on Baker Street is set in late Victorian London where a life of crime is the only way to escape poverty and servitude for one bright young . Barefoot on Baker Street - Charlotte Anne Walters.

Barefoot on Baker Street is set in late Victorian London where a life of crime is the only way to escape poverty and servitude for one bright young workhouse orphan.

Barefoot on Baker Street. Poverty, infatuation, loss and the journey to maturity in Victorian England. Barefoot on Baker Street. The Continuity Girl brings together Sherlock Holmes, the Loch Ness Monster and a touch of romance – no easy feat! t. 13 June 2018 at 19:16 ·. Public.

Barefoot on Baker Street is set in late Victorian London where a life of crime is the only way to escape poverty and servitude for one bright young workhouse orphan

Barefoot on Baker Street is set in late Victorian London where a life of crime is the only way to escape poverty and servitude for one bright young workhouse orphan. Tell us if something is incorrect. We aim to show you accurate product information. Manufacturers, suppliers and others provide what you see here, and we have not verified it.

Sherlock Holmes: Have Yourself a Chaotic Little Christmas (Gwendolyn Frame). The Whole Art of Detection: Lost Mysteries of Sherlock Holmes (Lyndsay Faye)

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Barefoot on Baker Street is set in late Victorian London where a life of crime is the only way to escape poverty and servitude for one bright young workhouse orphan. The narrative follows Red on her incredible life-journey as it twists and turns through poverty, riches, infatuation, loss and love. A dramatic escape from the workhouse at thirteen propels Red into a world of slum housing, street gangs, prostitution and petty crime as the rapidly expanding city groans under the weight of the industrial revolution. A chance meeting with the mysterious and eccentric Sherlock Holmes prompts an infatuation which cuts through her street-wise bravado. Red's blossoming criminal career also brings her to the attention of Professor James Moriarty. An autistic savant riddled with obsessive compulsions, Moriarty is a dangerous criminal who draws Red into his life and onto a collision course with Holmes.
  • Perfectly pointless drivel. There is far better FanFiction out there for free. And this is what we call a Mary-Sue: a completely selfindulgent selfinsertion of the writer. The POV-character "Red" is born and grows up in the worst London workhouse. Everyone else is weak and scrawny and ugly because of malnutrition and continuous hard work. Only she grows up to be a perfect beauty with immaculate skin, fiery red hair and icy blue eyes.... (see, where this is going?) Everyone else's spirit is broken, only she is intelligent, free-spirited and fiery. (yawn...)

    She then escapes the workhouse and joins the Bakerstreet Irregulars - which are far from the charming bunch ACD portrayed them as - and gets to know Sherlock Holmes who fascinates her. Sadly, the author is totally incapable of conveying the why and how of this fascination and nothing in her narrative lets me see what is so special about that guy.

    The writer does not even master the basest technique of storytelling: right in the middle of a first-person POV account of her heroine "Red" we are suddenly treated to a part of the story she could not have witnessed which is told in third-person omniscient or something (sometimes POVs are so convoluted it's hard to tell who sees/tells what).

    She is a member of the BI when these are commissioned to watch out for the barge "Aurora" (The Sign of Four), which they don't do btw, she is the one who originally steals The Blue Carbuncle, but Holmes let's her get away with it, because the plumber guy who's convicted in her stead raped her etc. Oh, yes! Absolutely every man wants to have sex with her and several rape her and, of course, everyone is a terrible pervert (especially the gay Greek interpreter, because of the gay, omg, or his son (lost track)).

    Because the narrative swivels between several time levels (without providing convincing transitions, I might add), I'm not quite sure how Red ended up becoming Professor Moriarty's wife, but when he ended her pregnancy forcibly and against her will, I've had enough and before I smashed my precious Kindle against the next available wall I decided to delete this god-awful drivel and vent my anger here.

    Buy this if you must - but don't come complaining to me!

  • **SPOILER ALERT***

    Charlotte Walter's book "Barefoot on Bakerstreet" tells the story of Red, a never before documented love interest of Sherlock Holmes (and ultimately Watson's) life. There are no new mysteries that are introduced or deduced. Ms Walter's re-tells existing Sherlock Holmes published stories with the Red storyline woven throughout. I am a HUGE Sherlock Holmes fan, and I can be a little snobby and "purist" about how I like my Sherlock Holmes. I am open to other authors adding their voice, and even modern takes on the characters (such as the Mystery PBS Sherlock series-- LOVE! and the Laurie King books) but if I think that someone has taken liberties (such as those AWFUL Sherlock Holmes movies with Robert Downey Jr.) it rubs me the wrong way. Technically, I think the romance between Red and Sherlock is extremely UNLIKELY given the Sir Arthur Conan Doyle stories (he was pretty much asexual) this book captured my imagination and I thouroughly enjoyed the fantasy of the romance.

    "Barefoot" starts a little shaky and I can only assume that Ms. Walters is a fairly new author. Some of the writing feels clunky and full of background information that is frankly not necessary. And every once in a while, there is an unbelievable sentence or something happens that you think "Did I just read that?" However, I encourage you to look past these newcomers mistakes, and read on. There is much to enjoy.

    My favorite part was how the author tied in the original Conan-Doyle stories and managed to add the love interest. I found myself cheering Red on, and being happy for a brief time that FINALLY Sherlock found a woman to love (even if it was UNLIKELY). I liked the descriptions of London that Ms Walters wrote-- it really made it come alive for me. And of course, even though probability of such a strong women in Victorian England was probably quite small, I still was pleased to see a strong woman character in Red.

    I was glad I bought this Kindle book, and will look for more from this author in the future as she grows in her art.

  • Based on the description I had high hopes when I purchased this book. Unfortunately I was greatly disappointed. Not a bad start but the plot disintegrated.

  • I couldn't put this one down. It kept me engrossed the whole time. The personal story of Red's maturity from (horrible) social degradation to upper class, corrupt power to moral domesticity is emotional and exciting. The author does a great job incorporating pieces of original Arthur Conan Doyle storylines from the original Canon. She stayed true to Holmes for the most part and though I don't think some of Holme's actions (or inactions) made sense to the original vision of ACD, it did not matter, because the writing was so poignant and engaging! So much happens in this book that your imagination is quite fulfilled and satiated. Recommended!

  • This book is unique in that I've never seen a reasonably-good book for the most part totally self destruct in the last 25 pages or so. Although many plot elements were done well it seemed the writer felt obligated to insert items of total stupidity which could have been deleted without affecting the flow of the narrative in the least. The 'True Confessions' aspects could have been left out; they added nothing to the narrative or quality of the plot. I'd recommend buying the book used as it isn't worth the full price and not wasting your time with the last 20 pages or so.

  • Don't bother if you're looking for a Holmes novel. This was start to finish a romance novel - a bad romance novel - imho.

  • And it could have been much better. The parts depicting Moriarty and his circle are original if a little over-the-top. But the "heroine" is a simple brute and the end result is just another trashing of Conan Doyle's work. One star is about all it deserves.