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ePub Murder at School download

by James Hiton

ePub Murder at School download
Author:
James Hiton
ISBN13:
978-0884118299
ISBN:
0884118290
Language:
Publisher:
Amereon Ltd (November 8, 1999)
Category:
Subcategory:
Mystery
ePub file:
1177 kb
Fb2 file:
1433 kb
Other formats:
rtf mbr azw mbr
Rating:
4.5
Votes:
338

James Hilton was born in Leigh, Lancashire, England on September 9, 1900. While attending the Leys School in Cambridge, he published several stories in the school magazine.

James Hilton was born in Leigh, Lancashire, England on September 9, 1900. In 1918, he won a scholarship to Christ's College, Cambridge, where he joined the University Officer Training Squadron. Before he saw any action, the war ended.

Murder At School' is James Hilton at his best with the schoolmaster characters somewhat reminiscent of. .

Murder At School' is James Hilton at his best with the schoolmaster characters somewhat reminiscent of similar characters in his equally excellent 'Goodbye Mr Chips'. Shelves: light-reading, mystery. There is a reason that many of Hilton's books have been made into movies. He writes a darn good story. He was a very successful writer in his day and (although he's out of style at present) I think he was a talented story-teller. This was his only mystery novel and was published under a pen-name.

James Hilton was the author of more than twenty novels, including the bestselling Good-bye, Mr. Chips. Born in England in the year 1900, Hilton emigrated to the United States in the late 1930s.

Murder At School book. Murder At School' is James Hilton at his best with the schoolmaster characters somewhat reminiscent of similar characters in his equally excellent 'Goodbye Mr Chips'. Although this doesn't rank with Random Harvest and Lost Horizon, it is a good read that is delightfully British.

Colin Revell, impudent Oxonian and sometime sleuth, returns to his alma mater Oakington to puzzle over a schoolboy's "accidental" death.

James Hilton is probably best-remembered today for his trio of highly .

James Hilton is probably best-remembered today for his trio of highly romantic novels from the 1930s, all of which were turned into successful movies: Lost Horizon (1933), the tale of the lost civilisation of Shangri-La, first filmed with Ronald Colman in 1937 by Frank Capra (and in 1973 as a fairly laughable musical); Goodbye, Mr Chips. Now largely forgotten, Murder at School was one of Hilton’s earlier novels and was in fact his sole excursion into the traditional detective genre, though he did dabble in suspense and other related areas on occasion.

Was It Murder? by James Hilton. Taking place in that most traditional and confounding of English settings, the public school. Colin Revell, impudent Oxonian and sometime sleuth, returns to his alma mater Oakington to puzzle over a schoolboy’s accidental death. The accidents multiply in frequency and horror as Colin idly pokes about the Gothic quads, and the tightly modulated suspense ripens with a generous foretaste of Hilton’s later acclaimed talent: finely perceived, individual characters, overwhelming atmosphere, and full complement of adventure and romance.

Download Murder at School free in PDF & EPUB format Factory-sirens shrieked; groups of children straggled out of an elementary school opposite.

Download Murder at School free in PDF & EPUB format. Download James Hilton's Murder at School for your kindle, tablet, IPAD, PC or mobile. Factory-sirens shrieked; groups of children straggled out of an elementary school opposite. And the postman, observing Mrs. Hewston in her basement kitchen, descended the area steps and handed her three letters with the remark: "All for your young gentleman. A moment later the young gentleman was opening them.

Was It Murder? Authors: James Hilton. Books by same genres: The Case Has Altered. 10 2. /10 Your: Rate.

  • James Hilton's LOST HORIZONS is one of my favorite books. He was a very successful writer in his day and (although he's out of style at present) I think he was a talented story-teller. This was his only mystery novel and was published under a pen-name. Perhaps he felt that writing a mystery would blemish his reputation as a "serious" novelist, or maybe he was afraid to compete with the formidable women (Christie, Mitchell, Sayers, et al) who dominated the mystery genre in England at that time.

    The setting is a "public" (i.e. private) boys school called Oakington. Hilton's father was a head master, so he was familiar with the inner workings of such an institution. The narrator (young Colin Revell) is a hoot because he's unquestionably a spoof of the author himself. Like Hilton at a younger age, Revell is a bright, talented, unemployable university graduate who has written a self-published novel and is patiently waiting for the world to recognize his genius. It could be a long wait.

    He's called in for consultation by the present Head Master of Oakington, who can't decide if he has a problem on his hands. Revell is an "old Boy" (former student) and has a reputation for solving puzzles, so he's the obvious choice to look into the (probably) accidental death of one of the current students. Head Master Roseveare is a fascinating character - almost too good to be true, but with a mysterious past. The school "padre" or chaplain is a hearty, slangy type who represents the "muscular Christianity" that was popular in England at the time. One of the masters (teachers) who figures into the mystery is Lambourne, who's also a product of the time - having been badly gassed and shell-shocked in WWI, injuries which have left him scarred for life. Revell immediately becomes interested in Mrs. Ellington, the wife of one of the masters. A tiny woman, "almost pretty" and "vivacious in a shy way" she brings out all of the naive young man's protective instincts.

    When a second death occurs, Scotland Yard is involved and Revell finds himself in competition with a professional detective - the genial, shrewd Inspector Guthrie. Sadly, the older man isn't inclined to take his young colleague very seriously. As he puts it, he, too, was a bright young university graduate at one time, "but I've had twenty years of hard experience since...." The interaction of the two men and Revell's increasing enchantment with Mrs. Ellington makes for a very entertaining read. I doubt if many readers will guess the true culprit until very close to the end. I didn't.

    My only complaint is that the print of this edition is very large and I had to adjust the font size down. Usually I'm making it bigger! I think this is a good addition to the library of anyone who enjoys older British mysteries. It's not one of my favorites and it doesn't compare to LOST HORIZONS, but I like it.

  • James Hilton (British, 1900-1954), most famous for GOODBYE, MR. CHIPS, LOST HORIZON, and RANDOM HARVEST, also published one fair-play mystery--WAS IT MURDER? (U.S. 1931), aka MURDER AT SCHOOL (U.K. 1931)--that allows readers to match wits with the story's three detectives and its author.

    Despite the fact that two young boys die violently at a small private boarding school, the tone of this book is generally light and frequently quite humorous, largely at the expense of Colin Revell, the young amateur detective who is the story's central character. Revell, who is snobbish about his superior intellect, has long been writing a rambling, egotistical, satirical "epic" poem that deliberately resembles Lord Byron's DON JUAN. (Several examples of his recently composed stanzas appear at intervals throughout this mystery.)

    Revell is flattered when the headmaster of the school that prepared him for Oxford invites him to come and look into the unusual "accidental death" of one of the young students. Largely because the scene of the "accident" has been cleaned up, his investigation is inconclusive, but a few months later, when the brother of that first student also dies an unusual death, he returns to look into this as well. This time Revell settles on a likely suspect but has difficulties finding evidence that might lead to a conviction in a court of law.

    Suddenly a Detective Guthrie from Scotland Yard appears at the boarding school, having determined that the ruling of "accidental death" in the matter of the second brother was obviously faulty--because the elderly school doctor who examined the corpse failed to notice a bullet inside the boy's brain.

    After Detective Guthrie questions one of the school's teachers, that man is found dead of an overdose of a sleeping medication, and the question arises whether this third death is an accident or suicide ... or murder. Complicating things, a young woman comes forward and tells Guthrie and Revell about a conversation she had with the dead teacher the previous night.

    Readers who are paying attention should be able to "solve" most of what has occurred and who is behind most of it. I did so within a few pages of the guilty person's first appearance, but I still found this book engagingly written and quite entertaining. Hilton, besides mocking the fictional convention of the "gifted amateur detective," who easily succeeds where Scotland Yard fails, even has his characters specifically allude to Sherlock Holmes several times and discuss "detective fiction" in general.

    Two brief passages I considered offensive were (1) a character's casual use of the N-word as if that were a proper way to talk and (2) a Scotland Yard detective's blatantly sexist remarks about women in the final pages of the book. Weighing these and other factors, if I were giving this book a letter grade, in my judgment it deserves a solid "B" for its plotting, its very plausible psychology, and its enjoyable satirical comments.