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ePub American Tabloid: A Novel download

by James Ellroy

ePub American Tabloid: A Novel download
Author:
James Ellroy
ISBN13:
978-0449000908
ISBN:
0449000907
Language:
Publisher:
Ballantine Books (June 23, 1997)
Category:
Subcategory:
Thrillers & Suspense
ePub file:
1482 kb
Fb2 file:
1203 kb
Other formats:
lrf txt docx azw
Rating:
4.1
Votes:
671

American Tabloid is a 1995 novel by James Ellroy that chronicles the events surrounding three rogue American law enforcement officers from November 22, 1958, through November 22, 1963.

American Tabloid is a 1995 novel by James Ellroy that chronicles the events surrounding three rogue American law enforcement officers from November 22, 1958, through November 22, 1963. Each becomes entangled in a web of interconnecting associations between the FBI, the CIA, and the mafia, which eventually leads to their collective involvement in the John F. Kennedy assassination.

Acclaim for James Ellroy’s. Thoroughly engrossing. The Sunday Times (London). A graphically violent, profane expression of personal and political corruption. The book’s prose is spare and minimalist, so hard-boiled you could bounce it off the sidewalk. James Ellroy was born in Los Angeles in 1948. His novel American Tabloid was Time magazine’s Novel of the Year for 1995; his memoir My Dark Places was a Time Best Book of the Year and a New York Times Notable Book for 1996. He lives in Kansas City. Also by James Ellroy.

American Tabloid – James Ellroy The first novel in Ellroy's extraordinary Underworld USA Trilogy, American Tabloid follows three men moving beneath the glossy surface of power in the run up to John F Kennedy’s assassination. LISTEN: Renegade Writing - James Ellroy on American Tabloid. Ellroy reads from American Tabloid, which exposes the underbelly of a country on the threshold of Kennedy's golden age. LISTEN: 'The American Dostoevsky'

James Ellroy's AMERICAN TABLOID is very clever, perhaps too clever for its own good. Parts are intriguing might-have-been history; parts are ridiculously false; parts are out-and-out absurd. And yet, the book entertains, fascinates, and resonates.

James Ellroy's AMERICAN TABLOID is very clever, perhaps too clever for its own good. In portraying America in the Kennedy years, Ellroy chainsaws one of our sacred cows; it's almost as if Seymour Hersch decided to write gleeful trash for "The Enquirer. And yet there are enough anchors in accepted American history to keep the book (almost?) believable.

American Tabloid book.

A novel of the Kennedy era, portraying the president in a far from flattering light. There are three protagonists: a CIA agent who pimps for JFK, another agent who trains anti-Castro rebels, and a lawyer who is a Mafia hunter. Through their eyes are. Through their eyes are seen the conflicting interests of the Kennedys, the director of the FBI, organized crime, organized labor, Castro and Cuban exiles. By the author of White Jazz.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. We are behind, and below, the scenes of JFK's presidential election, the Bay of Pigs, the assassination-in the underworld that connects Miami.

His novel American Tabloid was Time magazine's Best Book (fiction) of 1995; his memoir, My Dark Places, was a Time Best Book of the Year and a New York Times Notable Book for 1996. Библиографические данные. American Tabloid: A Novel A Borzoi book Underworld USA Trilogy (Выпуск 1). Автор.

James Ellroy American tabloid Part I S H A K E D O W N S November-December 1958 1 P e t e B o n d u r a n t (Beverly Hills, 11/22/58) HOFFA. James Ellroy American tabloid. America was never innocent. 2 (Philadelphia, 11/27/58) 3 (Chicago, 11/30/58) 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Part II January 1959-January 1961 12 13 14 15 16 17 . We popped our cherry on the boat over and looked back with no regrets. You can’t ascribe our fall from grace to any single event or set of circumstances. You can’t lose what you lacked at conception.

We are behind, and below, the scenes of JFK's presidential election, the Bay of Pigs, the assassination--in the underworld that connects Miami, Los Angeles, Chicago, D.C. . . . Where the CIA, the Mob, J. Edgar Hoover, Howard Hughes, Jimmy Hoffa, Cuban political exiles, and various loose cannons conspire in a covert anarchy . . . Where the right drugs, the right amount of cash, the right murder, buys a moment of a man's loyalty . . . Where three renegade law-enforcement officers--a former L.A. cop and two FBI agents--are shaping events with the virulence of their greed and hatred, riding full-blast shotgun into history. . . .James Ellroy's trademark nothing-spared rendering of reality, blistering language, and relentless narrative pace are here in electrifying abundance, put to work in a novel as shocking and daring as anything he's written: a secret history that zeroes in on a time still shrouded in secrets and blows it wide open.
  • James Ellroy does something remarkable here -- he creates, not an alternate history of the United States in the late 1950s and early 1960s, but a plausible *actual* history, filling in the gaps between known historical facts with richly imagined and finely portrayed fiction. In particular, he crafts three white lawmen (or in one case, a former lawman) who find themselves working together and against each other in dealings with the mafia, the FBI, the CIA, Cuban refugees after Castro's revolution, and the Kennedy family. Almost every page in the book is plausible and I found myself frequently checking the names of minor characters online to see if they were real people. The story is so compelling and the characters so convincingly portrayed that I think my impressions of J Edgar Hoover, Jack Kennedy, and others may be permanently changed, despite the fact that intellectually I know this book is a work of fiction.

    So why just four stars? First, Ellroy is weak in crafting the voices of his characters. They may be southern or northern, educated or not, of Irish or Italiian or Cuban background, but they all basically talk the same. Near the beginning he tries to explain this by saying that two of the characters (one from Quebec and the other from Alabama) had worked hard to eliminate their childhood accents, but this comes across as pleading by Ellroy for us to forgive his inability to give them believable voices. In scenes where several of these characters are talking with each other, it can be hard to tell who is saying what. A line like "I hear you are working for Hoover now" could come from the mouth of any of them, directed to any of the others.

    Second, Ellroy rushed the end of the book. He knew he wanted to get to Dallas, November 1963, and it feels like at some point (mid-1961 in the narrative) he felt pressed for time. He speeds up the story, skips details, character motivations become less believable, plot holes are left open. The story's final conceit, that Jack Kennedy was killed as a way to stop Bobby Kennedy's prosecution of the mob, doesn't really work given what has been established about the Kennedy family by that point (especially the fact that much of the Kennedy family's own money, in this story, comes from financing mob activities).

    Finally, and this is a minor point, with the exception of a brief bit about Marilyn Monroe, the story is almost relentlessly dark. The book would have benefitted from more humor, interludes to give the reader a break from the darkness and desperation. We all know where the story is going to end; I wish Ellroy had given us something that's *not* miserable along the way.

  • FBI/CIA/Mafia types threaten, bribe, beat and kill a swath through the historical scandals leading up to the election of Jack Fitzgerald Kennedy and until his demise. In other reviews of this book, much has been made of the clipped writing style that James Ellroy used for this novel. Suffice it to say that the technique's novelty did not wear out before I got to the last page, but I don't know if I could handle reading a second novel written in this fashion. The characters are so hard boiled that you could hammer nails with them, and Ellroy renders historical characters in such a breezy, freewheeling manner that it feels as though one might walk through your door in the next minute. Not that you'd want to spend any personal time with these violent sleazeballs. Howard Hughes, Jimmy Hoffa, Santos Traficante, RFK and J. Edgar Hoover spring vividly to life, and no peccadillo is too taboo for Ellroy's characters to ruminate over as they jostle back and forth between the historical interludes, rendered as secret agency memos and headlines, which serve as bookends for each chapter.

    You don't so much as identify with these characters, as you do identify against them and root for their demise. The only sympathetic character is Lenny the homosexual lounge act and mob/upper-crust hang around, and that's stretching it, since he's a lowlife, too. You might need a shower or two after reading this thing.

  • John F. Kennedy as a Yankee Bill Clinton. J. Edgar Hoover as an American Stalin. And Jimmy Hoffa, Joe Pesci-style. You can't hate a book that gives you these images.
    James Ellroy's AMERICAN TABLOID is very clever, perhaps too clever for its own good. Parts are intriguing might-have-been history; parts are ridiculously false; parts are out-and-out absurd.
    And yet, the book entertains, fascinates, and resonates.
    In portraying America in the Kennedy years, Ellroy chainsaws one of our sacred cows; it's almost as if Seymour Hersch decided to write gleeful trash for "The Enquirer." And yet there are enough anchors in accepted American history to keep the book (almost?) believable.
    This is not to say that Ellroy has not deviated from established fact; while it's quite funny to assert that the JFK/Marilyn Monroe affair was just a spur-of-the-moment prank on the part of a disgruntled CIA op with a sense of irony, it certainly deviates from reliable scholarship. Such devices are not neccesarily bad; however, like a precocious kid chiding his mom for crying during a film, they tend to remind the reader that the book in hand is, after all, nothing more than an entertaining story.
    And yet, as such, there is much to like. Ellroy's lightning-fast style is at its best here, the clipped sentences just brusque enough to paint the picture. Too, interesting characters inhabit the multi-layered plot; perhaps most interesting is the "Death Wish"-like transformation of wimp FBI agent Ward Littell into a stone-cold mob lawyer. Historical personages such as JFK, RFK, Hoffa, Hoover, Jack Ruby, and especially Howard Hughes are well-sketched; even if this isn't reality, it's the way many of us would LIKE to picture them.
    Which brings to mind a might-have-been of my own: the obvious omissions. Besides blowing off Monroe, Ellroy also avoids any mention of Judith Campbell Exner, the death of JFK's infant son, and Lee Harvey Oswald (I was dying to find out how Ellroy intended to portray HIM); too, there are no enduring portraits of LBJ, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., or the Cuban Missile Crisis. These are things you might expect the author to have woven into the intricate plot, ESPECIALLY in a book called "American Tabloid."
    And, as other reviews have mentioned, the ending falls D.O.A. flat.
    Yet somehow, AMERICAN TABLOID overcomes these flaws, carves out rules of its own, and holds the reader's attention from first page to (disappointing) last, proving positively that Ellroy is not just a crackerjack crime writer; he has artistic fingers on the pulse of the mainstream as well.