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ePub Dreams in the Key of Blue (Lucas Frank) download

by John Philpin

ePub Dreams in the Key of Blue (Lucas Frank) download
Author:
John Philpin
ISBN13:
978-0553580068
ISBN:
055358006X
Language:
Publisher:
Bantam (August 1, 2000)
Category:
Subcategory:
Thrillers & Suspense
ePub file:
1567 kb
Fb2 file:
1867 kb
Other formats:
mbr azw docx lrf
Rating:
4.6
Votes:
659

John Philpin, whom, I assume, doesn't have a degree in criminal psychology, talks trash on the people who do in the book.

John Philpin, whom, I assume, doesn't have a degree in criminal psychology, talks trash on the people who do in the book. He blows out of proportion the disagreements over jurisdiction that all state and federal agencies have, and he makes the person from the FBI look like a joke.

Books by John Philpin. my dreams are in the key of blue. I’ve heard that Dr. Lucas Frank is a recluse, Gilman said, bobbing his head. I was surprised that you agreed to come out here. THE PRETTIEST FEATHERS (with Patricia Sierra). TUNNEL OF NIGHT (with Patricia Sierra). I resisted the impulse to smash through the ancient plaster that remained in place only through the grace of generations of wallpaper and artlessly applied paint. The timing of the invitation was right, I said, feeling not the slightest need to tell him anything more.

Start by marking Dreams in the Key of Blue as Want to Read . It's hard to talk about the many decisions I think Philpin made a wrong turn on without.

Start by marking Dreams in the Key of Blue as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. The book starts out interesting enough and appears to be well-written, but as the story folds it becomes a convoluted mess. It's hard to talk about the many decisions I think Philpin made a wrong turn on without spoilers, but the book ends up almost being silly. He would have been wise to write a straightforward serial killer book without going for something new or trying to throw so many red herrings.

John Philpin Every serial killer fits a profile, follows a pattern, makes a. .It begins with a brutal triple homicide in the picturesque Maine town of Ragged Harbor.

John Philpin Every serial killer fits a profile, follows a pattern, makes a mistake Six years ago forensic psychiatrist Lucas Frank "retired" from hunting serial killers. But someone wants him back in the worst way. And it won't stop there. Suddenly Lucas is forced to do what he swore he would never do again: enter the twisted mind of a killer who enjoys murder.

Lucas Frank has met his match. That’s why he was called out of retirement. One of the first independent criminal profilers, John Philpin is an internationally recognized expert on violent behavior and criminal investigation. But does someone want him to catch a killer–or be the ultimate trophy? Read An Excerpt. See All. Also by John Philpin. See all books by John Philpin. Philpin is a frequent consultant to law enforcement and the media.

The woman in the limo visited Mellen Street and asked for Harper Dorman. A similar woman visited Katrina Martin ifications to the scrimshaw. She selected the timber rattler as her serpent. Were Lily Dorman and Melanie Martin the same person? Always, there were questions. Amanda Squires presented the gift of etched whalebone that depicted a tale of vengeance. Was Squires connected to Martin? Days later, someone crept into my house and deposited a timber rattler in the study

Lucas Frank Series John Philpin. The Prettiest Feathers. I am entirely delighted with my decision

Lucas Frank Series John Philpin. Patricia Sierra, John Philpin. John Philpin, Patricia Sierra. I am entirely delighted with my decision. In the serial killer genre there are many imitators, but few minds as innovative as John Philpin. Read "Dreams in the Key of Blue" and have nightmares! By Thriftbooks. com User, January 5, 2001. That's why he was called out of retirement. An excerpt from Dreams in the Key of Blue. One of the first independent criminal profilers, John Philpin is an internationally recognized expert on violent behavior and criminal investigation

Lucas Frank has met his match. But does someone want him to catch a killer-or be the ultimate trophy? Keep Reading. CHAPTER 1. I drove into Ragged Harbor, Maine, and felt an immediate sense of deja vu. The freedom that seemed so illusory to me as a street kid in Boston's Roxbury section, I discovered south of the city on Nantasket Beach in my teens.

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A serial killer wears many faces, but none more terrifying than this one...Every serial killer fits a profile, follows a pattern, makes a mistake.  Until now...Six years ago forensic psychiatrist Lucas Frank "retired" from hunting serial killers. But someone wants him back in the worst way. It begins with a brutal triple homicide in the picturesque Maine town of Ragged Harbor. And it won't stop there. Suddenly Lucas is forced to do what he swore he would never do again: enter the twisted mind of a killer who enjoys murder.  Only this time Lucas must hunt a psychopath whose pattern of behavior defies all logic. A killer who can strike anyone, anywhere, anytime. The FBI is helpless. And even he is baffled at the contradictory clues and taunting hints left behind.Lucas Frank has met his match. That's why he was called out of retirement.But does someone want him to catch a killer--or be the ultimate trophy?
  • Plot/Storyline: 5 Stars

    This was an intriguing mystery filled with many twists and turns. The reader can get an idea of who the killer is pretty early on, but it's finding out who that person is that is the real clincher. Yes, that sounds weird, but that's the only way I can describe it.

    One thing I love about Mr. Philpin's books, the two I have read so far, anyway, is how he gives true insight into the reasoning behind a killer's actions. So many books within the serial killer genre give weak excuses for killing, or even no other reasoning than that the person was insane. While that may be true in real life, I like my fiction to be neatly packaged, with a pretty bow tying everything up. This book does not disappoint.

    Although the main character, Lucas Frank, is not with law enforcement, the legal issues within the book stick to reality. I can easily imagine all of the events happening within the framework of reality.

    Having the killer's motivations explained through a journal was a stroke of genius. Not only does it give insight to the reader, but the journal provides realistic clues for Frank to follow. There are no insane leaps of intuition here, just good, logical clues that Frank follows.

    I enjoyed the fact that Frank is not infallible. He makes plenty of mistakes throughout the story before reaching the end. He misses some clues at first, nearly to his desctruction.

    The action scenes were well drawn and easy to follow. No one got blown up or eviscerated and lived to tell the tale.

    Character Development: 5 Stars

    Lucas Frank is a marvelous character. He appears in at least two other novels by Mr. Philpin. However, each one is a stand alone with development all its own. Frank's character shows continuity and growth throughout this novel that lends a realistic feel.

    The killer is also well developed. As mentioned above, we get full insight into the killer's motivations and actions.

    Writing Style: 5 Stars

    Mr. Philpin knows how to wield words to keep readers enthralled to the very end. The descriptions are vivid, concise, and gruesome, when necessary. The dialogue gives terrific voice to each distinct character.

    Editing/Formatting: 5 Stars

    Both were of professional quality.

    Rating: R for Violence, Child Abuse, Murder

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  • This novel wasn't written very well. I have several problems with it, including:
    1. It uses the first person voice for Dr. Lucas Frank, the protagonist. This is annoying to me, for some reason that I can't quite explain. First person for the killer makes sense, but Lucas should be in third.
    2. John Philpin, whom, I assume, doesn't have a degree in criminal psychology, talks trash on the people who do in the book. He blows out of proportion the disagreements over jurisdiction that all state and federal agencies have, and he makes the person from the FBI look like a joke.
    3. The author, having researched the case studies of serial killers, thinks that profiles aren't really good for anything, and that they are mere foolishness, despite their accuracy and usefulness. They aren't the be all and end all of criminal studies, but they are quite useful.
    If you can get past all of these problems, you still have to deal with a weak story, an author who likes to jerk you around with contradictory information, and statements that are simply obnoxious.
    Stated simply, the book is not worth your time. Read something else, unless you are voracious. Pass.
    Harkius

  • I finished reading this book because I had paid 6.50 plus shipping.
    Nothing is exactly right in this book. At page 30 I already knew "whodunit". It was so obvious that I really expected a twist, sth to give me a thrill in the end. Hmph.
    The caracther's developments are simplorious, the plot is irregularly paced and the reader's intelligence is neglected all the time. Detection is nonexistant: the "detective" simply listens to others telling him every single thing about the crimes. Crime-solving becomes crime-listening.
    No twist worth mentioning, and the subplots are left loose toward the ending. Really a bad bad reading. I'm feeling betrayed by the previous recommendations!!!

  • John Philpin has the goods! This is my first time out with Lucas Frank. It was a pleasure. I developed an immediate rapport with his crusty, technophobe, dryly humorous hero. The broody late-fall Maine location sets the tone of this psychological thriller. His characters (a few too many) are well drawn and the pace never flags. The book is not for the faint hearted, but it is not shocking for the sake of shock. Realism stalks throughout. I felt the events had really happened, probably due to Mr. (Dr.?) Philpin's long career in forensic psychiatry. The man has walked the walk.
    My only reason for withholding the fifth star was a few too many clues. The reader got ahead of events, always a bad mistake in a mystery. The hero must have more aces of his sleeve than the reader can fathom. This flaw is not fatal; you are in for a great read with a highly likeable guide.