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by James Lasdun

ePub Seven Lies download
Author:
James Lasdun
ISBN13:
978-0099483687
ISBN:
0099483688
Language:
Publisher:
Vintage Books USA; New Ed edition (February 1, 2007)
Category:
Subcategory:
Thrillers & Suspense
ePub file:
1450 kb
Fb2 file:
1405 kb
Other formats:
lrf lit lrf doc
Rating:
4.9
Votes:
368

James Lasdun's 'Seven Lies' is about a young East German in the 80s who longs to restart his life in New York City. It has a political sub-theme, lots of Lasdun-navel-gazing, a bit of depressing romance, and an interesting family angle

James Lasdun's 'Seven Lies' is about a young East German in the 80s who longs to restart his life in New York City. It has a political sub-theme, lots of Lasdun-navel-gazing, a bit of depressing romance, and an interesting family angle. Having been horrified by the cardboard characters in his noted 'Horned Man' I wanted to take another whack at Lasdun because his vocabulary and structure is kind of challenging.

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James Lasdun is a tremendous writer and Seven Lies is that rare thing, a novel that delivers on every level. It is so gripping that you want to gobble it down at a single sitting, and yet the prose is so exacting that you want to linger over every sentence. Pitch-perfec. nd what finely wrought character. omplex plot falls into place with the irresistible inevitability of a clockwork’s gears and levers. The Globe and Mail (Canada). Super. very page of this narration bears examples of Lasdun’s own poetic master. hockingly vivid. Time Out. A surprising.

I wandered into the kitchen, where the scene was taking place. Otto’s broad, open face was a burning red colour. My mother was at her iciest. My mother was at her iciest his behaviour signifies. Perhaps it makes you feel more grownup to get drunk, is that it?’. But I didn’t do it!’. It’s a little pathetic, Otto, the thought of you sneaking in here to steal alcohol and then – what? – drinking it all alone under your blankets? Or is this what you do when you lock yourself in the bathroom?’. Otto flushed a deeper red. It is so gripping that you want to gobble it down at a single sitting, and yet the prose is so exacting that you want to linger over every sentence". More from this Author.

Seven Lies tells the story of Stefan Vogel, a young man growing up in the German Democratic Republic in the 1970s. When Stefan gives in to subterfuge or is humiliated, it is always as if "the harm being done to me had in some mysterious fashion already been done. It had already happened.

Seven Lies: A Novel by Lasdun, James at AbeBooks. Delivered from our UK warehouse in 4 to 14 business days. This book is printed on demand. uk - ISBN 10: 0393329089 - ISBN 13: 9780393329087 - W. W. Norton & Company - 2006 - Softcover.

James Lasdun (born 1958) is an English novelist and poet. Lasdun was born in London, the son of Susan (Bendit) and British architect Sir Denys Lasdun. Lasdun has written four novels, including

James Lasdun (born 1958) is an English novelist and poet. Lasdun has written four novels, including. a New York Times Notable Book, and., which was an Economist Book of the Year and was longlisted for the Man Booker Prize for fiction. He has published four collections of short stories, including. the title story of which was adapted for film by Bernardo Bertolucci as. in 1998. His latest collection.

  • A well-written and well-crafted novel about Lasdun's favorite duality: duplicity and authenticity. An absorbing read for lovers of suspense and psychological complexity.

  • 'Seven Lies' takes its name from a Martin Luther quote: "Every lie must beget seven more lies if it is to resemble the truth and adopt truth's aura." I'll add to the well-deserved five-star reviews here...Lasdun's background is poetry. This short (< 200 pp.) novel feels like poetry - sparse, yet elegant. Every word is chosen carefully. I recently saw 'The Lives of Others,' Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck's movie debut, which just last night was awarded the Oscar for Best Foreign Language Film. IMDB says that 'Lives...focuses on the horrifying, sometimes unintentionally funny system of observation in the former East Germany.' For those of you who enjoyed that great film, 'Seven Lies' is a good place to go next, as it mines the same vein.

  • Sorry, I just didn't like it. The story dragged on with nothing much happening. Maybe if I'd stuck with it, I would have liked it in the end.

  • Being from East Germany, I was intrigued by the story line and bought it.
    Within the first three pages I was wondering what the author is talking about. Beautiful prose or not, too many words required a dictionary for my reading, which can kill not only the most eloquent prose but also the enthusiasm to finish such book. Very disappointing for me.

  • Afer a dramatic prologue in New York in 2003, the first four chapters of this book are extraordinary and compelling. They take us back to the life of the adolescent Stefan Vogel in East Berlin during the last few years of the DDR in the 1980s. The portrayal of Stefan's coldly "aristocratic" mother and the sway she exerts over her family and a circle of people who attend her monthly soirées is absolutely superb. She tells lies about the gifts of her son, and he in turn feels bound to live up to what she had told her circle. He does not enjoy the desperate life of deceit on which he now embarks, but he manages to distance himself from it to an extent by observing it from the outside, as if everything that happened had "already happened" to someone who was already dead. In this way he seems to mirror the East German state, also based on a system of lies and also nearly dead. Then comes a series of chapters in which Stefan becomes involved with a group of young people in the Prenzlauer Berg district of East Berlin who challenge the crumbling regime in satire and song. Though these chapters lack the tensions of the earlier ones, they are very evocative of the time and place. He falls in love with Inge Leibus, an actress he meets there. In 1986 he manages to emigrate with her to America - we only learn later how this was achieved.

    There is a marvellous description of the vibrancy and purposefulness of New York life that so delighted Stefan when he first arrived there - all so utterly different from the world he thought he had left for ever. But he worries when that world collapsed and its web of deceit is laid bare. It takes some more years before his own part in it fearsomely catches up on him.

    A quite superb novel, subtle in its psychology and beautifully written.

  • I was impressed by Lasdun's twisty, intriguing Horned Man but I think Seven Lies is a notch better -- the kind of work that makes you plot a second reading before even finishing the first. At some point I began realizing that I would need a second copy, just so that I could feel free to underline whole paragraphs of iridescent and insightful prose. What is equally impressive to me is Lasdun's tricky deftness in plotting -- just when you think he's let a thread unintentionally drop you realize that he's been leaving it slack for a last-minute twist -- and the vivid originality of his psychological portrayals. I don't think I've ever read a better description of depressed passivity than Stefan's (the protagonist) musings or a more painful depiction of passionless, well-intentioned lovemaking, or an equally vivid take on the rush New York City's street life delivers to recent European immigrants. Another of Lasdun's great gifts is his ability to convey aspects of character that the first-person narrator himself does not perceive, so that by the novel's very end we understand that what the Stefan has presented as reality is, in fact, evidence of a destructive blind spot. Not a feel-good book by any means, unless brilliant fiction makes you feel good!

  • The previous two reviews say it all. Just want to agree with their words and hope more people discover this undiscovered author. I first knew his name when I saw the Bertolucci movie Besieged and got the collection of short stories at the library, the title story upon which the movie is based. Somehow he fell off my radar and he's come back to me and I've just recently read Seven Lies and The Horned Man--loved them both. His writing is to use the overused word nothing short of brilliant. In the case of Vogel, Lasdun will bring you down down down into the well of Vogel's spiritual decay. Lasdun writes poetry as well and has several books but I only know the short stories and two novels. To anticipate other books by Lasdun is a reason to live.

  • James Lasdun's 'Seven Lies' is about a young East German in the 80s who longs to restart his life in New York City. It has a political sub-theme, lots of Lasdun-navel-gazing, a bit of depressing romance, and an interesting family angle. Having been horrified by the cardboard characters in his noted 'Horned Man' I wanted to take another whack at Lasdun because his vocabulary and structure is kind of challenging. The characters in this one moved around in that same false way, but at least the backgrounds and historical angle were worthwhile. Around page 57 I knew how Stefan, the main character, would end up and I suspect you will too. But it still was an average-good read.