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by Len Deighton

ePub Xpd download
Author:
Len Deighton
ISBN13:
978-0394512587
ISBN:
0394512588
Language:
Publisher:
Knopf; 1st American ed edition (March 12, 1981)
Category:
Subcategory:
Thrillers & Suspense
ePub file:
1803 kb
Fb2 file:
1638 kb
Other formats:
azw lrf lit docx
Rating:
4.3
Votes:
798

Len Deighton asserts the moral right to be identified as the author of this work.

Len Deighton asserts the moral right to be identified as the author of this work. This novel is entirely a work of fiction. The names, characters and incidents portrayed in it are the work of the author’s imagination. Any resemblance to actual persons, living or dead, events or localities is entirely coincidental.

Long-awaited reissue of the second part of the classic spy trilogy, GAME, SET and MATCH, when the Berlin Wall divided not just a city but a world

The classic spy thriller of lethal computer-age intrigue and a maniac's private cold war, featuring the same anonymous narrator and milieu of The IPCRESS File. The fourth of Deighton's novels to be narrated by the unnamed employee of WOOC(P) is the thrilling story of an anti-communist espionage network owned by a Texan billionaire, General Midwinter, run from a vast computer complex known as the Brain. Long-awaited reissue of the second part of the classic spy trilogy, GAME, SET and MATCH, when the Berlin Wall divided not just a city but a world. A lot of people had plans for Bernard Samson-¦.

We’re not certain of that. London won’t let us dip into the Washington computer, you know, not even unofficially. Could be a chance for us,’ said the CO. He looked at the section head quizzically. But they are both about the same age; so it’s probable. ‘I don’t think we’re going to get anything out of this,’ said the section head. The section head nodded. The CO said, ‘On an answering machine, is it?

So were two million or more of the rarest of rare books from the Berlin libraries, the complete Goethe collection from Weimar, and paintings and prints from all over Europe. It would take half an hour or more to read through the list of material. I’ll let you have a copy. Stuart nodded but didn’t speak.

So were two million or more of the rarest of rare books from the Berlin libraries, the complete Goethe collection from Weimar, and paintings and prints from all over Europe. It was late afternoon and sunlight made patterns on the carpet, moving across the room until the bright bars slimmed to fine rods and one by one disappeared. The DG went across to the bookcases to switch on the large table lamps.

He was frightened that the Russians might capture one of us and obtain information about him and the day-to-day life at the headquarters. At the end of every corridor my papers were checked against a log-book entry

He was frightened that the Russians might capture one of us and obtain information about him and the day-to-day life at the headquarters. At the end of every corridor my papers were checked against a log-book entry. When we got to the ante-room I took my pistol from its holster and gave it to the Waffen SS guards. There was a table filled with them, each gun tagged with the name of the owner.

Leonard Cyril Deighton (/ˈdiːtən/; born 18 February 1929) is a British author. Deighton is considered one of the top three spy novelists of his time (along with Ian Fleming and John le Carré). In addition he is a highly acclaimed military historian,. In addition he is a highly acclaimed military historian, cookery writer, and graphic artist. The IPCRESS File (1962), his first novel, was an instant bestseller and broke the mould of thriller writing. The Sunday Times called him "the poet of the spy story"

Len Deighton (born 18 February 1929) is an English author known for his novels, works of military history, screenplays and cookery writing

Len Deighton (born 18 February 1929) is an English author known for his novels, works of military history, screenplays and cookery writing. He continued to produce what his biographer John Reilly considers "stylish, witty, well-crafted novels" in spy fiction, including three trilogies and a prequel featuring Bernard Samson.

June 11, 1940 – where is Winston Churchill?A private aircraft takes off from. Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. XPD. by. Len Deighton.

Deighton Le. en Deighton XPD ‘The Second World War produced, in the end, one victor, the United States, one hero, Great Britain, one villain, German. Hitler, by N. Stone 1 In May 1979, only days after Britain ’s ne. . Stone 1 In May 1979, only days after Britain ’s new Conservative government came to power, the yellow box that contains the daily report from MI6 to the Prime Minister was delivered to her by a deputy secretary in the Cabinet Office. He was the PM’s liaison with the intelli. The Second World War produced, in the end, one victor, the United States, one hero, Great Britain, one villain, German. Stone.

Ships from and sold by MACSTUFF1. The real star of Deighton's cast in this book is Charlie Stein. Deighton displays his finest talent in painting this American war veteran in perfect colours. Tom Clancy couldn't have bettered Deighton's depiction of this sergeant running an Army Company with absolute confidence.

A film about the wartime theft of a top secret British document propels the intelligence agents of England, America, Germany, and the Soviet Union into desperate and violent pursuit
  • Yawn.

    If you want a synopsis of the plot, try another review. Full disclosure: I only got through 30% of this book until I was bored out of my mind and gave up.

    After reading one-third of XPD, I didn’t care about any of the characters, especially the main character. He seems completely ambivalent about being a British spy. It’s not that he’s conflicted about what’s truly right and wrong in the gray world of international espionage. It’s as if he doesn’t care either way.

    The author really lost me when he wrote that the main character liked living in Marina del Rey because it was close to Beverly Hills and Culver City. Huh?? First, Marina del Rey to BH is a 40-minute slog of a drive on surface streets, and that’s on a good day. Second, Culver City?? Who cares about being near Culver City? In the late ‘70s there was nothing redeeming about CC.

    Methinks the author wrote this book so he could take a free trip to SoCal to “soak up the atmosphere” for this book.

  • I was never quite sure who I was supposed to be rooting for in this not quite dull book that was overpopulated with two dimensional characters. I am a Deighton fan, but I would not call this one of his best…certainly not on the same level as the 'Harry Palmer' stories or 'Winter' or the Bernard Sampson books. Any of which would be a far better first time choice for someone who has never read this author.

  • What a delightful writer. The subject and detail may seem a little dated now but this is still a thoroughly good read.

  • It's an interesting and engaging read. Not as good as other Deighton works, but certainly pulls you along the story to the end. A good spy thriller.

  • Not bad but he has written better

  • GOOD BOOK

  • This was a suspense thriller that was almost completely lacking in action and suspense. The characters are a melange of good guys (British SIS (aka MI-6) and CIA) and bad guys (Nazis and Russians) but the plot is never really fleshed out. The book concerns some Nazi documents that are hidden at the end of the war (along with a cache of Nazi gold) that have damning evidence of how Churchill tried to sue for peace in the dark days of May 1940. And while this would be an embarrassing admission, it's never quite clear why it's so all-fired important that these documents not come out. After all, the war has been over 35 years (at the time of this writing).

    Trapped in the middle are the remnants of 'Kelly's Heroes'. A platoon of American soldiers that discovered and secreted the documents - along with the gold - and now have both sides after them. The good guys - who want to suppress the release of the documents - and the bad guys - who want to use them to embarrass the good guys and undermine democracy in Europe, especially West Germany.

    The characters aren't particularly unique or memorable. The writing is competent enough; it's the plot that isn't fully fleshed out. And the book is also lacking in the tradecraft and technical details that make for a compelling espionage thriller.

  • Deighton has surpassed even his normally high quality work with this post-World War II thriller. Weaving a compelling tale of finance, intrigue and history, he draws the reader into the story with subtle proficiency. This departure from his established run of 'spy' novels was an inspired decision. It's a shame this book isn't on the active inventory here.
    The story recalls the recovery of hidden Nazi gold, art and documents by American soldiers at the end of World War II in Europe. Some of the soldiers seize the opportunity to filch some of the treasure, setting up a Swiss bank. The real prize, however, resides in the documents - they possess a secret from the early days of the war. The pivotal point of the story, the secret is sought by many, each with their own focus. It's a compelling idea, given impetus by the 'discovery' of a set of 'Hitler's Journals' a few years ago. The bogus Journals don't detract from Deighton's quite credible suggestion hidden in the documents' pages.
    Without taking anything away from the plot, it is Deighton's characters that remain his strong point. In this book he conveys unalloyed identity to a diverse cast of participants from the US, Germany, the UK and Russia. None of them fails to convince the reader of their authenticity. You come to know them intimately, even the unpleasant ones. Strangely, the weakest character is the British Intelligence agent, Boyd Stuart. Remoulding Bernard Samson into Stuart would have been transparent, leaving Stuart slightly inconsistent. The real star of Deighton's cast in this book is Charlie Stein. Deighton displays his finest talent in painting this American war veteran in perfect colours. Tom Clancy couldn't have bettered Deighton's depiction of this sergeant running an Army Company with absolute confidence. Officers are merely decorative and built into the organization by default. The sergeants are the real managers, and Stein typically carries the ability through to today. Not having had a brain transplant from an American, Deighton's descriptive presentation of all of the Americans is more than just impressive.
    Deighton's prodigious research underlying this book is clearly brought into view through his adept writing skills. You will learn much from this book, while enjoying the story he weaves. Surprises abound, but nothing is out of place. A fine addition to any collection of Deighton, historical speculation, or just plain captivating reading. Why wasn't this story put on film?