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ePub The New Breed (Brotherhood of War Series) download

by Eric G. Dove,W.E.B. Griffin

ePub The New Breed (Brotherhood of War Series) download
Author:
Eric G. Dove,W.E.B. Griffin
ISBN13:
978-1455850570
ISBN:
1455850578
Language:
Publisher:
Brilliance Audio; Unabridged edition (January 15, 2013)
Category:
Subcategory:
Thrillers & Suspense
ePub file:
1950 kb
Fb2 file:
1788 kb
Other formats:
rtf mobi lit mbr
Rating:
4.7
Votes:
405

The New Breed (Brotherhood of War Series) by . Griffin books I have read (10 in the Corps series and 9 in the Brotherhood of War series), this is the first one I have disliked.

The New Breed (Brotherhood of War Series) by . The reason is that it includes 100s of pages from previous books in the Brotherhood series. They appear in many places.

The New Breed (Brotherhood of War, Book 7) Mass Market Paperback. This is the third book in the Brotherhood of War series and it follows the characters developed in the first two books, plus, as expected, it introduces a few more

The New Breed (Brotherhood of War, Book 7) Mass Market Paperback. The Aviators (Brotherhood of War, Book 8) Mass Market Paperback. This is the third book in the Brotherhood of War series and it follows the characters developed in the first two books, plus, as expected, it introduces a few more. Each character interacts with the others, so it is an enjoyable read. Having read this series in book form many years ago, I still remember a lot of the pieces mentioned in this book and that was enjoyable.

Brotherhood of War Series. 9 primary works, 13 total works. Featuring the lives and exploits of the men of the . Army and the women who love them. Book 1. The Lieutenants. They were the young ones, the bright ones, th. ore.

William Edmund Butterworth III (November 10, 1929 – February 12, 2019), better known by his pen name W. E. B. Griffin, was a writer of military and detective fiction with 38 novels in six series published under that name. He has also published under. He has also published under 11 other pseudonyms and three versions of his real name (W. Butterworth, William E. Butterworth, and most recently William E. Butterworth III).

Griffin, Eric G. Dove (Goodreads Author) (Reading). THE NEW BREED As the Congo erupts in violent rebellion in 1964, old faces and new find themselves swept into a maelstrom of danger as the United States becomes more and more deeply involved.

Brotherhood of War Series, Book 4. By: W. Griffin. Husbands and wives, generals, colonels, and cocksure privates find that there is now not only a new breed of soldier, but a new breed of war - sudden, savage, played by no rules ever known before

Brotherhood of War Series, Book 4. Narrated by: Eric G. Dove. Length: 15 hrs and 50 mins. Husbands and wives, generals, colonels, and cocksure privates find that there is now not only a new breed of soldier, but a new breed of war - sudden, savage, played by no rules ever known before.

The Brotherhood of War is a series of novels written by W. Griffin, about the United States Army from the Second World War through the Vietnam War. The story centers on the careers of four . Army officers who became lieutenants in the closing stages of World War II and the late 1940s. The series is notable for the amount of attention it does not devote to combat.

The spectacular new book in "New York Times"-bestselling author . Griffin's Honor Bound saga of World War II espionage. Wars come to an end. But then new ones begin

The spectacular new book in "New York Times"-bestselling author . But then new ones begin. Just weeks after Hitler's suicide, Cletus Frade and his colleagues in the OSS find themselves up to their necks in battles every bit as fierce as the ones just ended. The first is political-the very survival of the OSS, with every department from Treasury to War to the FBI grabbing for its covert agents and assets

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Book One of the Brotherhood of War Series. Length: 13 hrs and 44 mins.

Brotherhood of War, Book 7. Series: Brotherhood of War, Book 7. Length: 12 hrs and 29 mins. Categories: Fiction, Historical. Book One of the Brotherhood of War Series.

As the Congo erupts in violent rebellion in 1964, old faces and new find themselves swept into a maelstrom of danger as the United States becomes more and more deeply involved. Husbands and wives, generals, colonels, and cocksure privates find that there is now not only a new breed of soldier, but a new breed of war—sudden, savage, played by no rules ever known before. To learn it, the men of the brotherhood must risk everything, but when the summons comes, they are ready to answer the call...
  • This one is so-so. After a surprising leap forward in time in the previous book, "The Generals" – including an epilogue in which the series' major characters are disposed of – Griffin moves back to fill in some of the time he missed. The story centers on the Communist-backed Simba uprising in eastern Congo.

    What I did like about this was its look into 1960s events in the Congo, about which I've seen passing references over the years but never had a feel for. Jack Portet, a character introduced in this book, is a young Belgian-American pilot whose father owns a small airline in the fledgling Democratic Republic of the Congo. He is drafted by the US – his late mother having been American – and goes off to serve. He’s another Griffin-series handsome, young, affluent, bi-national flyboy in the mold of Charlie Castillo in the Presidential Agent series and Clete Frade in the Honor Bound series.

    It’s 1964. Sandy Felter convinces LBJ, president now for a few months following JFK's assassination, that the Congo is as much of a trouble spot as Vietnam is. Initial worries are about another attempt by the rich Katanga province in the south to secede, it having done so once before, causing a civil war ended only two years previous. Felter, distrusting the CIA's agents, sends his own people in.

    Among them are East German refugee Karl-Heinz Wagner, now a Green Beret. Felter sends Wagner to South Africa to infiltrate the organization of mercenary leader Michael "Mad Mike" Hoare, the key to another Katanga secession attempt.

    But trouble comes from another quarter entirely: a grassroots rebel force further north that seizes Stanleyville, one of the Congo's biggest cities and home to many foreigners. They are then taken hostage. Western concerns about what might be seen as a strictly internal Congolese matter are heightened by hints that the Chinese Communists are aiding the rebels, looking for yet one more ideological toehold in Africa. And the rebels are a savage and primitive group – soldiers wearing animal skins, possessed of mystical beliefs that bullets can't hurt them, and prone to committing fearsome atrocities on Western civilians as they do to other Africans.

    Predictably, loved ones of our various heroes are at risk here, and predictably, our heroes go in to save them. We get a dramatization of Operation Dragon Rouge, the joint Belgian-American operation to free the hostages in late 1964.

    The story lurches around, though. It's hard enough to get the gist of who was fighting whom in the first civil war and how outside powers stacked up around that. It's tough getting the hang of how Congolese relate to Westerners. The Belgians are the hated colonialists but at some points in the book the rebels seem to hate the Americans more. Use of mercenaries seems to be taboo, partly because they too commit atrocities. But it’s also because that somehow suggests white troops are better than black ones, which at this point in time is definitely true but politically taboo to say. And they keep getting used because they're effective. Herein lies another problem for a good story line: Hoare, instead of being used to launch another Katanga uprising, becomes a good guy retained by the Congo government to put down the uprising.

    Also, whether the Chicoms are actually interfering is murky – I think it’s established late in the book with captured munitions found to have Chinese markings – and what they want in the short term is unclear.

    Griffin doesn’t answer all the geopolitical questions. It would have helped if he’d done so; few people know much about what went on there. More background would have helped. But on his usual stuff – the military, their doings and customs and cultural byways, the lives and romances of his characters – he’s fine.

  • Got the entire Brotherhood of War series, won't get into detail by book, because I don't want to ruin it for readers. Really liked Griffin's character development and ability to tell a story. Best part is after having lived in some of these locations myself, though much later than when the books are set, I love the accuracy and ability to see some of the things even today that are referenced in the books. A very well told story that I will read again, and I don't normally read books twice.

  • This is part of Griffin's "Brotherhood of War" series but is the first of the novels that departs from a strict chronological sequence. Although this is number 7 in the series, it takes place before most of the events in no. 6 "The Generals." Apparently the author decided to keep on with the series even though "The Generals" purports to more or less wrap things up.

    This is a story about Cold War activities in the Congo in the mid-1960s. Russia and China, and for that matter Cuba, are fomenting unrest there, and there is plenty of unrest to begin with. This is a pretty readable novel and can be read best as part of the series but would also be fine as a stand-alone novel. RJB.

  • I didn't even realize the volume existed, didn't know he had written one more in the series until I stumbled upon it, but I'm glad I bought it. I was fairly young at the time described in the book, but he draws on real events, real people, and real places, as usual. Read up on that time frame in central Africa, and find out what the benevolent "peacekeeping forces" of the UN really did in Katanga province. Likely impossible to find, but the documentary movie entitled "Katanga," ca. 1962, is an eye-opener, and not for the weak stomach. Griffin alludes to much of this kind of thing, and to his credit, illuminates a few incidents without dwelling on them more than necessary for plot development. The premise of a draftee private being involved to the extent and in such ways stretches things a bit thin, but still recommended, especially if you read the rest of the series and missed this one. If you like the genre, try Dark of the Sun with Rod Taylor and Jim Brown, or The Wild Geese with Richard Burton and Jonathan Harris. If Griffin were to write one more in this series, something about Special Forces, SeALs, and terrorism would be perfect.

  • Ive bought many of Mr. Griffin's books over the years, and have always enjoyed the characters and historical fiction context.
    In the past, my enjoyment of his novels were tempered by the availability or notice, of when a book might appear in a book retailer. SO my collection was infrequent and interspersed.
    Now, thanks to Amazon, It is easy to get an entire collection and read them uninterrupted.
    SO I am doing that...
    As to Book #7, The Brotherhood series is not as good as the Corps series, and this late book in the Brotherhood series, continually slows down and makes the same references to past events in earlier books. A constant rehashing of the finer points in the older books...

  • Another of WEBG's good books. The series continues. There is a little loss of continuity between this and last book but it is still good book. Not only is Griffin fiction good but you learn a lot about history, workings of the government, politics and workings of the government-not all of it good. I love Griffin but some of it in a series like this one gets a little repetative. I know this is important for readers of an individual book or comes in in the middle but it does get a little boring for a reader of the whole series. This is true of other series writers such as Clive Cussler and others but a series reader can skip through these back-story parts quickly. Read the whole series for good entertainment and history. RAG