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ePub Hall of a Thousand Columns : Hindustan to Malabar With Ibn Battutah download

by Tim Mackintosh-Smith

ePub Hall of a Thousand Columns : Hindustan to Malabar With Ibn Battutah download
Author:
Tim Mackintosh-Smith
ISBN13:
978-0719562259
ISBN:
0719562252
Language:
Publisher:
John Murray Pubs Ltd; 1st EX LIB edition (February 28, 2005)
Category:
Subcategory:
Asia
ePub file:
1538 kb
Fb2 file:
1188 kb
Other formats:
doc txt mobi azw
Rating:
4.9
Votes:
835

Tim Mackintosh-Smith is a British author who has settled in Yemen. He is a well known writer, traveler and lecturer. The book is, however, not easy to read. Mackintosh-Smith had used a little too much eloquence for a work of this kind.

Tim Mackintosh-Smith is a British author who has settled in Yemen. In this book, he retraces the footsteps of ibn Battutah, whose name he shortens to IB, which adds intimacy for the medieval traveler on the readers’ minds. He is accompanied by Martin Yeoman, illustrator of the book, who is also a painter, draughtsman, sculptor and etcher. His adroitness in finding synonyms in its multitudes baffles the readers as does his penchant for using colloquial terms liberally.

Hall of a Thousand Columns book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Hall of a Thousand Columns: Hindustan to Malabar with Ibn Battutah as Want to Read: Want to Read saving. All the best armchair travellers are sceptics  . Start by marking Hall of a Thousand Columns: Hindustan to Malabar with Ibn Battutah as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Also by Tim Mackintosh-Smith Yemen: Travels in Dictionary Land The Hall of a Thousand Columns: Hindustan to. .

Also by Tim Mackintosh-Smith Yemen: Travels in Dictionary Land The Hall of a Thousand Columns: Hindustan to Malabar with Ibn Battutah Landfalls: On the Edge of Islam from Zanzibar to th. Maps drawn by Martin Collins.

Tim Mackintosh-Smith studied Classical Arabic at Oxford. At the age of 21, he headed east for the real Arabia. His first book, Yemen: Travels in Dictionary Land, won the 1998 Thomas Cook/Daily Telegraph Travel Book Award and his next book Travels with a Tangerine was critically acclaimed. Country of Publication.

The Hall of a Thousand Columns. by Tim Mackintosh-Smith. Those of the fourteenth century were no exception: for them, there were lies, damned lies, and Ibn Battutah's India. Born in 1304, Ibn Battutah left his native Tangier as a young scholar of law; over the course of the thirty years that followed he visited most of the known world between Morocco and China.

Tim Mackintosh-Smith's Travels with a Tangerine introduced the modern world to Ibn Battutah, 'Prince of.

Tim Mackintosh-Smith's Travels with a Tangerine introduced the modern world to Ibn Battutah, 'Prince of Travellers'. Now they take to the road together once more for the next leg of Ibn Battutah's travels - the great subcontinent of India. transform mundane travel writing into the beguiling, the brilliant and the brave.

Tim Mackintosh-Smith takes a tour through India with a 14th-century adventurer in The Hall of a Thousand Columns. Sara Wheeler is enthralled. Mackintosh-Smith is interested in modern India only as a product, or descendant, of the country seen by IB. "What started with round-shot from the Lisbon arsenal," he notes after discussing 14th-century trade patterns in the Orient, "continues with the soft but deadly burger bu. He is determined to find out how much of IB's description was grounded in objective reality and how much dreamed up. Thus many pages are devoted to an apparently flat region of Hindu-stan where IB talked about mountains.

Ibn Battutah left India on a snake, stripped to his underpants by pirates; but he took away a treasure of tales as rich as any in.

Ibn Battutah left India on a snake, stripped to his underpants by pirates; but he took away a treasure of tales as rich as any in the history of travel. Back home they said the treasure was a fake. Mackintosh-Smith proves the sceptics wrong. India is a jewel in the turban of the Prince of Travellers. Here it is, glittering, grotesque but genuine, a fitting ornament for his 700th birthday. Mackintosh-Smith titled his continuation of Tangerine Hall of a Thousand Columns because he felt that when IB came face to face with the hall he also came face to face with his destiny (p 31). As much as I liked Tangerine is wasn't able to finish Hall. ) SeriousGrace Mar 15, 2017.

Tim-Mackintosh Smith, Travels with a Tangerine: A Journey in the Footnotes of Ibn Battutah (London: Picador, 2002) (e., The Travels of Ibn Battutah (Lon- don: Picador, 2002). 15. Mohammad Habib (e., The Political Theory of the Delhi Sultanate Includ- ing a Translation of Ziauddin Barani’s Fatawa-i Jahandari, circa, 1358–9 A. D. (Al- lahabad: Kitab Mahal, 1960). 16. The Indian Muslim historian denies Muhammad bin Tughluq’s hand behind the construction of the victory pavilion that claimed the lives of his father and brother in 1325

Tim Mackintosh-Smith studied Classical Arabic at Oxford.

Tim Mackintosh-Smith's Travels with a Tangerine introduced the modern world to Ibn Battutah, 'Prince of Travellers'. Now they take to the road together once more for the next leg of Ibn Battutah's travels -- the great subcontinent of India. Born in 1304, Ibn Battutah left his native Tangier as a young scholar of law. He returned nearly thirty years later having visited most of the known world between Morocco and China. To many contemporaries his tales were received as Munchausian fantasies -- and it was India that stretched his readers' credulity beyond the limit. Tim Mackintosh-Smith traces in situ the dizzy ladders and terrifying snakes of Ibn Battutah's Indian career -- as judge and hermit, courtier and prisoner, ambassador and castaway. Over the course of his journey he also finds a dead Muslim posing as a Hindu deity, Jesus popping up in the pulpit of a mosque, and the rotten tooth of a mad sultan being revered as a saint. Ibn Battutah left India stripped to his underpants by pirates; but he took away a treasure of tales as rich as any in the history of travel. Back home they said the treasure was a fake.What Mackintosh-Smith returns with proves the sceptics wrong: India is the jewel in the Prince of Travellers' turban.