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ePub Why Angels Fall: A Portrait of Orthodox Europe from Byzantium to Kosovo download

by Victoria Clark

ePub Why Angels Fall: A Portrait of Orthodox Europe from Byzantium to Kosovo download
Author:
Victoria Clark
ISBN13:
978-0333751855
ISBN:
033375185X
Language:
Publisher:
Macmillan Pub Ltd; First Edition edition (October 1, 2000)
Category:
Subcategory:
Canada
ePub file:
1450 kb
Fb2 file:
1674 kb
Other formats:
mbr mobi docx azw
Rating:
4.4
Votes:
278

Xviii, 460 pages, pages of plates : 24 cm. "Victoria Clark paints a startling portrait of Eastern Orthodoxy in Europe by uncovering deep traces of the past in the turmoil of the region's present.

Xviii, 460 pages, pages of plates : 24 cm. A 1054 schism between the churches of Rome and Constantinople created Europe's oldest and most durable fault line, represented today by the Catholic/Protestant West and the Orthodox East.

Victoria Clark traveled across most of Eastern Europe to write Why Angels Fall. Having worked for six years as a journalist in Romania, the former Yugoslavia, and Russia, Clark was fascinated by the Eastern Orthodox churches and keen to unravel their histories and beliefs

Victoria Clark traveled across most of Eastern Europe to write Why Angels Fall. Having worked for six years as a journalist in Romania, the former Yugoslavia, and Russia, Clark was fascinated by the Eastern Orthodox churches and keen to unravel their histories and beliefs. To do so, she journeyed from Mount Athos, to Serbia, Macedonia, Greece, Romania, Russia, Cyprus, and finally Istanbul, interviewing clergy and other believers

Why Angels Fall book.

Why Angels Fall book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Why Angels Fall: A Journey Through Orthodox Europe from Byzantium to Kosovo as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Victoria Clark worked for the Observer in Romania, the former Yugoslavia and Russia from 1990 to 1996, reporting the Croatian, Bosnian and first Chechen wars. Her first book, Why Angels Fall, was published in 2000 to great acclaim, followed by The Far-Farers in 2003. Библиографические данные. Why Angels Fall: A Journey Through Orthodox Europe from Byzantium to Kosovo.

Victoria Clark (21 November 2011). The Expansion of Orthodox Europe: Byzantium, the Balkans and Russia. ISBN 978-1-4472-1639-1. ISBN 978-0-7546-5920-4.

Why Angels Fall: A Journey through Orthodox Europe from Byzantium to Kosovo Victoria Clark Macmillan, £1. 9 .

Victoria Clark's inspiration was to trace this alienation not in a general or analytical way, but through a secular pilgrimage to the holy places of Orthodoxy and through interview after dogged interview with Orthodox clergy.

Clark bases her book on a suspicion that Samuel Huntington's theme in The Clash of Civilizations is correct: the societies of Eastern Orthodox Christianity are a civilization apart

Clark bases her book on a suspicion that Samuel Huntington's theme in The Clash of Civilizations is correct: the societies of Eastern Orthodox Christianity are a civilization apart. She then proves it to herself by traveling from monastery to monastery, country by country, from Cyprus to Russia. Only Belarus and Ukraine are not on her itinerary.

book by Victoria Clark. Only by understanding these other Civilizations from within, as Clark attempts to help us do, can we really objectively see it and our role in it from the West

book by Victoria Clark. Only by understanding these other Civilizations from within, as Clark attempts to help us do, can we really objectively see it and our role in it from the West. About the book itself then, Clark has chapters on the major flashpoints of the Orthodox world including the Balkans, Greece, Russia, etc. Each chapter gives a light historical treatment in the context of relevant contemporary interviews and encounters.

A Journey Through Orthodox Europe from Byzantium to Kosovo.

Clark's observation is unfailingly keen, often humorous. One of her choicest finds was in the office of the late Archbishop Mihail of Ohrid and Macedonia: a wall clock set in a chunk of unvarnished wood, roughly carved in the instantly recognisable shape of Greater Macedonia, comprising the FYROM, a slice of Bulgaria, another of Albania and, of course, the northern Greek province of Macedonia. county alone - represent an unmistakable reaffirmation of Romanian presence, to replace the 150 destroyed by the Habsburgs in Transylvania 200 years ago. She is not over-impressed by the calibre of all the new monks

A journalist tours the history, battlefields, and modern socio-political complexities of Orthodox Europe, in a study of the Orthodox faith from the late Byzantine era to the present day.
  • Ms Clark sets out on a journey through Orthodox lands trying to find out why (as she has decided beforehand, and keeps accumulating evidence for) Orthodox people are so backward and narrow-minded and petty (downright "Byzantine"!) despite what she senses is their having preserved a precious tradition of spirituality that is largely lost in the West. But she never comes to understand the first thing about the spirituality she claims to admire because she is so obsessed with seeking out (often through baiting her interlocutors) seemingly narrow-minded or superstitious beliefs and having her Western liberal sensibilities shocked! just shocked! by them. And in doing so, Clark merely retraces tired old pathways of Western bigotry that were already shopworn by the time of Gibbon. Imagine a cluster of men's monasteries that is restricted to men! How backward! But the reader might consider an "enlightened" Western journalist who went instead to an Islamic or Hindu country, eager to lob stones at anyone who dares to offend beliefs or practices fashionable among the elites of London or New York, and totally lacking in any sensitivity as to why these peoples may do things a bit differently. Surely they would be dismissed as utterly narrow and bigoted themselves. But somehow, it's always different with Eastern Christians.

    I have personally visited many of the places to which she travels and met a good number of the people she interviews. It is sad to think of what she could have learned had she set out with an open mind. Unfortunately, like all malicious, gossipy writing this book tantalizes the baser instincts of the reader. (Much more enticing to read page after page about Rasputin, an utterly failed monk of a century ago, than to try to understand the rich complexities of present-day Russian monasticism from within.) Thus, the reader who wants to understand anything serious about Orthodox culture and spirituality is wasting his or her time here. Try Markides "Mountain of Silence," or Dalrymple's "From the Holy Mountain." But if you are in search of salacious gossip that will make you feel snug and secure in your politically correct citadel, you will no doubt find this book to be quite satisfying.

  • Why Angels Fall fills an important gap in the Western literature about Orthodoxy-- the unvarnished examination of the current status of the Orthodox world. Much like the West's view of Islam, we are rarely presented with such a portrait. We see the "best foot" put forward by these other civilizations and in our self-destructive impulse, the worst about ourselves.

    This is reflected not only in our media but in our history and church history texts. The view of Orthodoxy presented there is often shallow and rosy, filling in no color of the broad worldview differences which make our civilizations different--not just an historical creedal disagreement. Here we learn, for example, about the Serbian perspective of the Balkan wars, which is quite different than the one we are accustomed to.

    Understanding, then, the information presented here, explains a lot more about Russian, Serbian, and other Orthodox policy orientations than we might really have the courage to face and is a nice complement to those who acknowledge the "Clash of Civilizations" posited by Harvard Political Scientist, Samuel P. Huntington. Only by understanding these other Civilizations from within, as Clark attempts to help us do, can we really objectively see it and our role in it from the West.

    About the book itself then, Clark has chapters on the major flashpoints of the Orthodox world including the Balkans, Greece, Russia, etc. Each chapter gives a light historical treatment in the context of relevant contemporary interviews and encounters. It's difficult to overstate how helpful this is--if only all history were given in context of contemporary worldview significance, maybe we'd understand it.

    Clark's perspective is definitely that of a secularist. Many other reviews identify this as purely negative, but for me, this was actually helpful because she was more of an outside observer with a stated bias, as opposed to an Eastern or Western church historian with political constraints.

  • Substance of manuscript proved more informational than expected.

  • Thanks for sharing realistic view of modern orthodox life that unfortunately is so far from early Church life. Hopefully accounts like these will wake up those bought into the false narrative that modern orthodoxy is perfect and above all else and call us to humbly repent and begin imitating the life of Christ as the early orthodox catholic faithful Bible believing Christian Church did so often!

  • I am Orthodox, and this Englishwoman is a good writer. I liked it, and she does not hide her bias. Good for her. Read it - altho I sure as "H" wouldn't pay the US$50+ they want for it new! LORD HAVE MERCY indeed!