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ePub Discover France (AU and UK) (Lonely Planet Discover Guides) download

by Nicola Williams

ePub Discover France (AU and UK) (Lonely Planet Discover Guides) download
Author:
Nicola Williams
ISBN13:
978-1742200941
ISBN:
174220094X
Language:
Publisher:
Lonely Planet Publications (March 1, 2010)
Category:
Subcategory:
Europe
ePub file:
1852 kb
Fb2 file:
1173 kb
Other formats:
azw mobi txt lrf
Rating:
4.9
Votes:
151

Lonely Planet Discover France book. Lonely Planet: The world's leading travel guide publisher.

Lonely Planet Discover France book. Lonely Planet Discover France is your passport to all the most relevant and up-to-date advice on what to see, what to skip, and what hidden discoveries await you. Take a scenic drive to Champagne-drenched Reims, get lost amid the fairy tale-like grandeur of a chateaux in the Loire Valley, or simply knock elbows with Lonely Planet: The world's leading travel guide publisher.

This book has clearly been well maintained and looked after thus far. Money back guarantee if you are not satisfied.

Inside Lonely Planet Discover USA: Full-color maps and images throughout. Highlights and itineraries help you tailor your trip to your personal needs and interests. Contact Lonely Planet here. Thank you for subscribing.

Lonely Planet Discover France Includes Paris & Daytrips - Paris, Versailles, Chartres, Champagne the Northeast, Brittany & Normandy, The Loire & Central France. This guide also includes: Burgundy, Lyon & French Alps. ISBN 10: 174220094X ISBN 13: 9781742200941.

Author:Williams, Nicola. Lonely Planet Discover France (Travel Guide). Publisher:Lonely Planet Publications Ltd. Each month we recycle over . million books, saving over 12,500 tonnes of books a year from going straight into landfill sites. Lonely Planet Discover France by Lonely Planet, Gregor Clark, Kerry Christiani, Nicola Williams, Jean-Bernard Carillet, Emilie Filou, Stuart Butler, Daniel Robinson, Catherine Le Nevez, Oliver Berry (Paperback, 2015). Pre-owned: lowest price.

Lonely Planet's Discover Paris 2019 is your passport to the most relevant .

Lonely Planet's Discover Paris 2019 is your passport to the most relevant, up-to-date advice on what to see and skip, and what hidden discoveries await you. Promenade down the Champs Elysees, lose yourself in the Louvre, and work your way through a feast of food and wine-all with your trusted travel companion. Check out Lonely Planet's France guide for a comprehensive look at all the country has to offer. Great book! I travel to Paris every year and this Lonely Planet guide is a fantastic update to keep me current with where to visit, where to stay, where to eat, and what to see.

Lonely Planet's Discover France is your passport to the most relevant . Check out Lonely Planet's France guide.

Lonely Planet's Discover France is your passport to the most relevant, up-to-date advice on what to see and skip, and what hidden discoveries await you. See the lights of Paris from the Eiffel Tower, go on a Champagne-tasting tour of Reims and explore captivating chateaux; all with your trusted travel companion.

Lonely Planet's Discover France is your passport to the most relevant, up-to-date advice on what to see and skip . Daniel Robinson, Oliver Berry, Stuart Butler, Nicola Williams, Lonely Planet, Jean-Bernard Carillet, Gregor Clark, Emilie Filou, Catherine Le Nevez, Kerry Christiani

Lonely Planet's Discover France is your passport to the most relevant, up-to-date advice on what to see and skip, and what hidden discoveries await you. Daniel Robinson, Oliver Berry, Stuart Butler, Nicola Williams, Lonely Planet, Jean-Bernard Carillet, Gregor Clark, Emilie Filou, Catherine Le Nevez, Kerry Christiani. Place of Publication.

Discover the freedom of open roads with Lonely Planet's France's Best Trips, your passport to up-to-date advice . Lonely Planet's France guide, our most comprehensive guide to France, is perfect for exploring both top sights and lesser-known gems. Looking for a guide focused on Paris?

Discover the freedom of open roads with Lonely Planet's France's Best Trips, your passport to up-to-date advice on uniquely encountering France by car. Featuring 38 amazing road trips, from 2-day escapes to 2-week adventures, you can get lost among the snowcapped Alps or taste your way around Champagne's hallowed vineyards, all with your trusted travel companion. Looking for a guide focused on Paris?

Pick your ideal journey from the 24 trip planners which take you to the best of each region, and show you how to make the most of your time in France.
  • This book is small and easy to carry, but lacks the depth that a larger book would have offered. This is a good thing because it doesn't confuse you with too many choices. However, it also does not include the detailed driving info and maps for many places. We needed the larger more detailed version since we were driving the entire trip.

  • A fresh new approach to the LP guides. Great maps, nice tour of the respective place.

  • Although "used", this book is like new. Have been finding much useful information & will use it alot in planning my trip to France.

  • This is a lively, colorful, cleverly crafted, crammed-with-photos, fun to browse, busy and, all in all, valiant attempt at introducing us to Europe's largest country in a mere 400 pages, but the result is a little like going out for a big dinner and discovering that the only thing on offer is a buffet table laden with nothing but appetizers. Or going to the movies and discovering that the only thing that comes after the previews is more previews. If that sounds good to you, then this is probably your book. If you're looking for more than a Cliff's Notes France, I think the guidebooks by Rick Steves (1,032 pages), Fodor's (848), Frommer (816) or Michelin (2,114) will likely serve you better, despite the added weight to your backpack.

    And if Paris is your focus, the 400+ page guides devoted exclusively to the City of Lights by Steves, Fodor or Frommer should also be considered. Here Lonely Planet offers just 50 pages on Paris and five of them are devoted to day trips outside the city. The rest of France is divvied up into six regions with three suggested itineraries for every featured spot along the way, along with a smidgen of history, brief blurbs on the most popular sights to see, and a few (often very few) listings of recommended places to sleep, eat, drink and shop.

    This is a British publication, so be prepared for some Britspeak along the way. (Like the description of Nice, where the "bars reverberate with a Babylonian hubbub of merry punters.") And check out some savvy little sidebars scattered throughout on such things as the truth about French kissing, the unhealthy obsession known as Sarkosis and the birth of the bikini. Most of the practical information travelers need to know seems thorough, well organized and helpful. The glossary of French words travelers should know could have benefited by some help with pronunciation. Also, I found many of the maps more confusing than helpful, particularly the Paris Metro map, which in 5x7 size is well nigh incomprehensible.

  • Lonely Planet has provided travelers with a handy, useful, and basic travel guide to France. This book has the usual Quick Reference guide inside the front cover with average exchange rates (which constantly fluctuates), hotel price ranges, business hours, telephone codes, Imperial/metric conversions, etc. The inside of the back cover has rudimentary French translations of commonly used phrases. The pages are easy to read, in full color with vivid photos and maps (with typical, smaller, harder to read text). Emphasis, like most guides, is on "the Highlights of France", i.e., the main tourist attractions. Some points of personal interest include the Champagne region to the NorthEast, D-Day Beaches in Normandy, Burgundy, Bordeaux, the French Alps, the French Riviera, a small section on the Principality of Monaco, and of course, Paris (briefly covered on pages 51-100. A separate 444 pages Paris City Guide is also available from Lonely Planet). All pictures and maps are in color, sections are also color-tabbed, and there are even some touring tips segments from local tour guides. All this in a svelte 408 pages compared to the behemoth 840 pages Frommer's France 2010. Overall a simple, light, colorful, easy to use travel guide that should be useful for most travelers. Vive la France!

  • This is a compact, but not lightweight book that will fit easily in a backpack. The publisher chose to use a thick, glossy paper which makes it sturdy, and makes the photos quite vivid, but which makes it relatively heavy. However, you could use it to plan your trip and then tear out and take with you each day the pages you will want to refer to.

    The book begins with France's Top 25 Experiences and these include wine tasting, visiting Versailles, the French Riveiera Beaches, Monet's Garden at Giverney, etc. This section is followed by "France's Top Itineraries." Another excellent feature is a section listing events by month to help in selecting a time of year to go. The book includes maps, BUT due to the page size and the fact that none of them are "fold out" style, you may need reading glasses to make use of them - particularly the map of the Paris Metro.

    The bulk of this book is comprised of information organized by region - Paris & It's Day Trips; Champagne & the Northeast; Brittany & Normandy; The Loire & Central France; Leon & The French Alps, etc. After these sections is one titled "France in Focus" and it covers Architecture, Art & Literature, Caught on Film, Family Travel, The French, French Cuisine, Frsh-Air Frolics, History, Shopping Wine. The "Focus" section is followed by general travel info about climate, customs, money, Visas, Festivals, etc.

    The Day Trips section was a disappointment - it included only Versailles and four other sites including Disneyland and some cathedrals. For some day trips from Paris like Versailles you can take a train, for others you will want to sign up for a bus tour.

    This isn't a book that can be your ONLY resource for trip planning - for instance, it has only 3.5 pages of hotels in Paris. However, it is very useful if you want to determine which parts of France you would like to see, and what major attractions are "not to be missed." If you plan to go to Paris, you really should get a book that covers only Paris in addition to this book.

    In addition to this book, for any trip to France you will want to find (either in a book or on the internet) a translation of common French food words. When I visited Paris my travel companion and I wanted to avoid restaurants that were oriented to tourists. We had torn from a travel book several pages of English translations of French food words so that we were able to get some understanding of the menus at restaurants that did not have English explanations. For your evening meal many restaurants expect reservations so if you find a place where you'd like to have dinner, ask your hotel if someone on staff can call and make the reservation for you.