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ePub Richard III download

by Ian McKellen

ePub Richard III download
Author:
Ian McKellen
ISBN13:
978-0879516857
ISBN:
0879516852
Language:
Publisher:
Overlook Books; First Edition edition (March 18, 1996)
Category:
Subcategory:
Europe
ePub file:
1613 kb
Fb2 file:
1154 kb
Other formats:
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Rating:
4.9
Votes:
347

Ian McKellen first became intrigued with the idea of bringing a new interpretation of RICHARD III to the screen while still thrilling theatre audiences with his performance in the Royal National Theatre's world tour of the play. I've spent most of my acting career in the theatre," McKellen notes.

Ian McKellen first became intrigued with the idea of bringing a new interpretation of RICHARD III to the screen while still thrilling theatre audiences with his performance in the Royal National Theatre's world tour of the play.

Sir Ian McKellen is among the most highly acclaimed actors in the English-speaking world. This book was written to illustrate how the Shakespeare play Richard III was rewritten and adapted for the screen in 1995. The movie was set in the 1930s. His appearances on stage, on screen, and on television have been numerous. He recently starred as Gandalf in the Lord of the Rings trilogy and recieved an Academy Award® nomination for his performance in The Fellowship of the Ring.

Richard III is a 1995 British drama film adapted from William Shakespeare's play of the same name, starring Ian McKellen, Annette Bening, Jim Broadbent, Robert Downey J. Nigel Hawthorne, Kristin Scott Thomas, Maggie Smith, John Wood, Tim McInn. Nigel Hawthorne, Kristin Scott Thomas, Maggie Smith, John Wood, Tim McInnerny and Dominic West. The film sets the play in 1930s Britain with Richard as a fascist sympathiser plotting to usurp the throne.

Watch Ian McKellen discuss Richard III, then join him live at our UK-wide screenings this Thursday!

The setting fits the play, and the adaptation is done amazingly well by actor Ian McKellen and director Richard Loncraine.

The setting fits the play, and the adaptation is done amazingly well by actor Ian McKellen and director Richard Loncraine. A fun bonus of the screenplay book is that McKellen has annotated it, telling the reader about the writing process and the production of the film. I'm hoping that my McKellen bias doesn't cloud my judgment of the film, but I don't think it does. This was the first film of his I ever saw, so my rabid fandom came later.

Sir Ian Murray McKellen CH CBE (born 25 May 1939) is an English actor. His career spans genres ranging from Shakespearean and modern theatre to popular fantasy and science fiction. He is the recipient of six Laurence Olivier Awards, a Tony Award, a Golden Globe Award, a Screen Actors Guild Award, a BIF Award, two Saturn Awards, four Drama Desk Awards, and two Critics' Choice Awards. He has also received nominations for two Academy Awards, five Primetime Emmy Awards, and four BAFTAs.

With Ian McKellen, Annette Bening, Christopher Bowen, Edward Jewesbury. Richard III (original title). R 1h 50min Drama, Sci-Fi, War 29 December 1995 (USA). The classic Shakespearean play about a murderously scheming King staged in an alternative fascist England setting.

Город: London, UKПодписчиков: 4 млнО себе: actor and activist.

Sir Ian McKellen is adding a new role to his impressive CV - that of a London bus tour guide showcasing locations seen in Richard II. Image caption Sir Ian McKellen is spearheading the BFI Shakespeare programme

Sir Ian McKellen is adding a new role to his impressive CV - that of a London bus tour guide showcasing locations seen in Richard II. Image caption Sir Ian McKellen is spearheading the BFI Shakespeare programme. Sir Ian McKellen is adding a new role to his impressive CV - that of a bus tour guide. The star of stage and screen is to host public tours of the London locations seen in the film in which he played Richard III more than 20 years ago. The film, directed by Richard Loncraine, was set in an alternative fascist 1930s England. Locations included St Pancras station, Battersea Power Station and the building that is now Tate Modern.

This is the screen-play of Sir Ian McKellen's adaptation of Shakespeare's "Richard III". It is illustrated with stills from the film and records the progress from the original text to the completed film. It contains notes and anecdotes from the cast and crew.
  • This book was written to illustrate how the Shakespeare play Richard III was rewritten and adapted for the screen in 1995. The movie was set in the 1930s. Ian McKellen, the star of the film, wrote about decisions which were made in deleting some dialogue and rewriting some lines in order to accommodate the needs of modern movies and to change the theme from a sordid tale of royal intrigue to a story of dictators and fascism. He also provides some fascinating insight on the locations shot in the film and what it was like to work with this excellent cast. The film version lines are on the right pages and commentary on the left, as well as some photos. If you have not seen the movie yet, you certainly should before reading this book, as much of it will be confusing. I myself enjoyed it because I liked the movie.

  • McKellan's sceenplay for his movie of Richard III is a great read for anyone interested in how a script becomes a play or how a play becomes a movie. McKellan's side bar comments on how scenes were shot or decisions were made on what language to cut, change, or move are insightful and a lot of fun. Because the movie started as a stage production, the book addresses not only how to film Shakespeare, but also the changes that can or must be made when a play is filmed. Also worth noting is McKellen's introduction, which contains the best explanation of blank verse (Shakespeare's verse form) that I have ever encountered. I recently repurchased this book through Amazon; I lent it to one of my college professors a few years ago and never saw it again. I can't think of many books that I'm willing to buy twice, so I give this book my wholehearted endorsement.

  • I use the word "collection," because readers will not only be treated to the screenplay, but also to Sir Ian McKellen's breezy, comfortable style of writing in his thorough introduction and annotations. For those familiar with his Official Homepage notes, Sir Ian captures you most willingly with his conversational tone and easy wit. (There are also plenty of well-captioned b/w photos to support "the script.") An excellent purchase.

  • the best Richard 3 ever!

  • Ian McKellan played Richard III on the stage in London, then touring the world, under Richard Eyre's direction and the Royal National Theatre of Great Britain's auspices. Like many great productions of Richard III in the past, there was an anticlimactic sense about things when the lengthy run ended - McKellan compares his production (justifiably) to those of Henry Irving and David Garrick, but longs for the lasting legacy of Laurence Olivier, who translated his successful stage production into a lasting cinematic production. Richard Eyre issued the challenge to McKellan to produce a screenplay, which he did, in collaboration with Richard Loncraine.
    It is true that Shakespeare is the 'author' of Richard III - of course, much of Shakespeare's authoring involved heavy borrowing, redaction and crafting. This is not to take anything away from Shakespeare's achievement, but rather to prove the adage 'good writers borrow from others; great writers steal from them outright'. However, every production of a Shakespeare play requires modification of some sort; bringing Shakespeare productions to the screen (indeed, bringing any stage-play to the screen) requires a recrafting to suit the medium. McKellan and Loncraine rearranged and edited expertly the play to suit a film.
    McKellan provides a brief introduction to the history and the play. Richard III has been an enigmatic and controversial character - Shakespeare's play is probably more in keeping with Tudor propaganda against Richard III (from whom they took the throne) rather than actual history; Richard's malformed physical form and malicious character may be fictions, or at least great exaggerations, designed to serve the purpose of bolstering Tudor legitimacy. McKellan points out (a theory not unique to him, by any means) that the Tudors had as much to gain from the disappearance of the princes in the tower as Richard himself; had they survived and been recognised as heirs of the throne, Tudor legitimacy would have been much less credible.
    McKellan describes the decision to update the tale of Richard III into more modern times as one to provide clarity of narrative. Indeed, for this production, Richard is seen as a storm-trooper similar to the militant cadres of Germany in the 1930; his grasp for power is very similar in tone to the rise to dictatorship of any number of fascist leaders, but the Nuremberg-Rally character of Richard's accession leaves little doubt as to the parallel. On stage and screen, in a drama such as these, people need to be readily identified in their roles; Elizabethan dress (or earlier dress) is confusing to the modern eye, but the difference between costuming for military, aristocracy, etc. in the modern time is readily identifiable. The exact historical situation is not directly relevant - given that Richard III already takes liberties with the actual history of the time, why not take more in the name of accessibility to the audience?
    McKellan gives an extensive background tale to the problems of revision (Richard III had to be cut; be turned into a visual rather than auditory experience, given the sensibilities of modern cinema-goers; etc.) and the tale of finding support, backing and funding. He talks about the difficulties involved in finding adequate sets and actors (McKellan originally envisioned filming around the British Parliament; due to various issues, that idea was squashed, but the alternative, the Parliament in Budapest, became a fascinating and acceptable alternative, particularly given that the building is Budapest was modeled after the one in Westminster). With final funding, casting, director and all in place, the show did proceed.
    This is not the complete text of Richard III by any means. As McKellan points out, Shakespeare plays have been trimmed since the very beginning, to suit times, troupes and audiences. Richard III is one of the longer plays - few audiences would be willing to sit through three to four hours of Shakespeare in the cinema, particularly for a lesser-known play. Thus, this is a version roughly two-thirds the actual length; however, due to cinematic magic, most of the story remains without great distortion.
    There is a running commentary throughout the screenplay. This includes both commentary on the play and commentary on the film. Production photos complement the text, including some scenes that were not included in the final film. The screenplay not only includes the text of the dialogue, but also other production directions and descriptions, particularly of those relatively few scenes in which there is no dialogue.
    This is a fascinating look at the back-side of a Shakespeare play-become-film. I highly recommend it to fans of Shakespeare, McKellan, modern culture, and those with a care for the cross-currents of the various strands in primary Western culture.

  • Love the book,love Sir Ian more.