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ePub The Best American Travel Writing 2007 download

by Susan Orlean,Jason Wilson

ePub The Best American Travel Writing 2007 download
Author:
Susan Orlean,Jason Wilson
ISBN13:
978-0618582174
ISBN:
0618582177
Language:
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt (October 10, 2007)
Category:
Subcategory:
Travel Writing
ePub file:
1234 kb
Fb2 file:
1500 kb
Other formats:
mobi txt lrf mobi
Rating:
4.2
Votes:
813

I love all the Best Travel Writing books.

I love all the Best Travel Writing books. They show that travel writing shouldn't always be about hotels, spas, and restaurants. this volme has four women writers out of twenty, although i wonder what the significance is that of the four, two articles appeared initially in Gourmet.

Contributors include Ian Frazier, Ann Patchett, David Halberstam, Peter Hessler, and others. ISBN13:9780618582181. Release Date:October 2007.

The Best American Travel Writing is a yearly anthology of travel literature published in United States magazines. It was started in 2000 as part of The Best American Series published by Houghton Mifflin.

by Jason Wilson, Susan Orlean. Travel is not about finding something. The twenty pieces in this year’s collection showcase the best travel writing from 2006. It’s about getting lost - that is, it is about losing yourself in a place and a moment. The little things that tether you to what’s familiar are gone, and you become a conduit through which the sensation of the place is felt. from the introduction by Susan Orlean.

The Best American Essays 2005. by Susan Orlean · Robert Atwan. The Bullfighter Checks Her Makeup: My Encounters With Extraordinary People. Twenty years ago, before she wrote The Orchid Thief or was hailed as a national treasure by The Washington Post, Susan Orlean was a journalist with a question: What makes Saturday night so special? To answer it, she embarked on a remarkable journey. My Kind of Place: Travel Stories from a Woman Who's Been Everywhere.

Posts About The Best American Travel Writing. 875" Bill Bryson

Город: New YorkПодписчиков: 313 ты. себе: Writer, writer, writer.

Travel is not about finding something. The little things that tether you to what’s familiar are gone, and you become a conduit through which the sensation of the place is felt

Travel is not about finding something. The little things that tether you to what’s familiar are gone, and you become a conduit through which the sensation of the place is felt more eces in this year’s collection showcase the best travel writing from 2006

Jason Anthony describes the challenges of everyday life in Vostok, the coldest place on earth, where temperatures dip as low as minus-129 degrees and where, in midsummer, minus-20 degrees is considered a heat wave.

Jason Anthony describes the challenges of everyday life in Vostok, the coldest place on earth, where temperatures dip as low as minus-129 degrees and where, in midsummer, minus-20 degrees is considered a heat wave. David Halberstam, in one of his last published essays, recalls how an inauspicious Saigon restaurant changed the way he and other reporters in Vietnam saw the world. Ian Frazier analyzes why we get sick when traveling in out-of-the-way places. And Kevin Fedarko embarks on a drug-fueled journey in Djibouti, chewing psychotropic foliage in "the worst place on earth.

Author: Susan Orlean. Title: The Best American Travel Writing 2007. No user reports were added yet. Be the first! Send report: This is a good book. Help us to make General-Ebooks better! Genres. Non-­Fiction, Travel Books.

“Travel is not about finding something. It’s about getting lost -- that is, it is about losing yourself in a place and a moment. The little things that tether you to what’s familiar are gone, and you become a conduit through which the sensation of the place is felt.” -- from the introduction by Susan OrleanThe twenty pieces in this year’s collection showcase the best travel writing from 2006. George Saunders travels to India to witness firsthand a fifteen-year-old boy who has been meditating motionless under a tree for months without food or water, and who many followers believe is the reincarnation of the Buddha. Matthew Power reveals trickle-down economics at work in a Philippine garbage dump. Jason Anthony describes the challenges of everyday life in Vostok, the coldest place on earth, where temperatures dip as low as minus-129 degrees and where, in midsummer, minus-20 degrees is considered a heat wave.David Halberstam, in one of his last published essays, recalls how an inauspicious Saigon restaurant changed the way he and other reporters in Vietnam saw the world. Ian Frazier analyzes why we get sick when traveling in out-of-the-way places. And Kevin Fedarko embarks on a drug-fueled journey in Djibouti, chewing psychotropic foliage in “the worst place on earth.”Closer to home, Steve Friedman profiles a 410-pound man who set out to walk cross-country to lose weight and find happiness. Rick Bass chases the elusive concept of the West in America, and Jonathan Stern takes a hilarious Lonely Planet approach to his small Manhattan apartment.
  • I first came across Susan Orlean when, after watching the film Adaptation (Superbit Collection), I bought the book upon which it was based, Ms. Orlean's The Orchid Thief: A True Story of Beauty and Obsession (Ballantine Reader's Circle). Although I found the latter to be wordy, I went on to read two collections of Ms. Orlean's shorter pieces: My Kind of Place: Travel Stories from a Woman Who's Been Everywhere and Saturday Night. In both cases, the topics were (to me) quite interesting, but by some sort of magic, Ms. Orlean managed to make her descriptions of them tedious. [I am aware that she writes for the New Yorker, and that admirers of that magazine now consider me a cretin].

    Liking her choice of topics, I bought this book, thinking that she would have managed to choose some interesting travel pieces, but failing to realize (stupid me) that she was most likely to appreciate monotonous writing like her own.

    In fact, there are no traditional (or nontraditional, for that matter) travel pieces in this collection, a fact that Ms. Orlean makes clear in her introduction: "My rules (for selecting a piece) were very uncomplicated: one, the stories had to take place somewhere in the physical world, and two, I had to like them a lot." In other words, any essay on any topic would qualify as long as Ms. Orlean liked it.

    So, if you've enjoyed Ms. Orlean's writing in the past, you'll probably enjoy this book. On the other hand, if you have not or are not familiar with Ms. Orlean, you'll probably do better elsewhere.

    The one piece in the book I found riveting was "High in Hell" by Kevin Fedarko, which appeared in GQ managine. For me, that piece justified the cost of the book, although it did not justify the tedium of reading the other articles.

  • I've been a big fan of this series since 2003 and was looking forward to the 2007 edition, especially Susan Orlean is the editor. Sorry to say I am disappointed. While some of selected stories have the superb writing and imagery that makes this series on travel writing so good, unfortunately there are also stories included that were too long and unengaging. Is it worth buying? If you haven't read the earlier editions, choose one of those first.

  • I'm reading the whole series! Awesome education, too.

  • Arrived unbelievably fast and was in great condition as well. i'm using the book for a class entitled "Writing About Place" and my teacher is in love with the book.

  • This collection is panned by the majority of Amazon Reviews who say it is not up to the standard of previous volumes. I am not a great traveler and not a great Travel reader, and have not read the previous collections so I cannot really comment on that. I will admit that I did not find any of the pieces I read overwhelmingly exciting. I thought the most interesting intellectually was Rick Bass's meditation on the meaning of the West, 'Lost in Space.' I don't think I got it all but clearly this is a person who is profoundly contemplating his own experience, and for whom being in a place has more than simple meaning. Actually the piece I most enjoyed was by a much revered writer whose work I have never loved David Halberstamm. His recalling his early days as correspondent in Saigon and a group of journalists who would dine with him there each day had a certain feeling of Adventure I suspect good travel writing should have. I also thought Steve Friedman's account of a fat- man's cross- country walk quite instructive. Ian Frazier's 'A Kielbasa Too Far' about sickness and travel is the most useful piece in the collection. Reesa Grushka's account of her visit to my own town Jerusalem was in some ways very good, but too had as I feel it, a bit of missing the mark. The beauty and poetry of Jerusalem , the Holy City, and the magic feeling which comes to many Jews at first being here was touched upon in this essay but not as strongly as I would have liked.

  • This has to be the worst "Best American Travel Writing" edition I've seen so far. As a big taveler and a big fan of travel writing, I buy this book every year. There's usually four or five great essays in it, which makes it worth the money for me. But this issue of 2007 is so off the mark. I found almost nothing in it of real interest. I don't know what the editor was thinking. As far as I can tell, Susan Orlean is not known a a traveller. Why she was chosen to put together this year's editon of this book is beyond me. I think it takes one to know one.

  • I've long been a fan of the various Best American books, but this was my first year to read the travel writing, but I figured, Susan Orlean, okay. My mistake. Most of the pieces were tedious, though I did enjoy Jason Anthony, Ian Frazier, Steve Friedman, Nando Parrado (but didn't he already write this), and my two favorites, though I'm not sure I'd call them travel writing, Andrew Solomon and Jonathan Stern. It's because of them two that I'll probably pick up next year's edition.

  • For those of you looking for travel writing as a form of appealing escapism, avoid this book. Susan Orlean is either clinically depressed or prefers to roll around in the more tragic underbelly of the world's great places. Those of us who travel know that the world is a far from perfect place and that great poverty and cruelty exist in the world, but is it really necessary to throw it in our faces, essay after essay after essay? I mean, seriously, essays children surviving on scavanging on mountain-high mounds of garbage? Drug-induced stupors in Djibouti? Hunger induced cannibalism in the Andes? Even the few fluff pieces she picked are depressing, i.e., surviving off of processed foods on Swan Island. What a depressing entry in an otherwise great series. Someone get that woman a Prozac subscription stat.