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ePub A Grammar of Western Dani download

by Peter Barclay

ePub A Grammar of Western Dani download
Author:
Peter Barclay
ISBN13:
978-3895862977
ISBN:
3895862975
Language:
Publisher:
LINCOM publishers (2008)
Category:
ePub file:
1694 kb
Fb2 file:
1854 kb
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4.8
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It is spoken by the Lani people in the province of Papua. Barclay, Peter (2008). A Grammar of Western Dani.

It is spoken by the Lani people in the province of Papua. The Swart Valley tribes are called Oeringoep and Timorini in literature from the 1920s, but those names are no longer used.

A Grammar of Western Dani. There are a relativelysmall number of verbs in Western Dani. All the word classes are discussed beginning with the nouns. While somenouns may have plural forms, normally the same form is used for bothsingular and plural. Nominals may be used preceding verbsto give new meanings and as well, complex actions may be designated not bya separate verb but by joining together the various constituent simpleactions. Verbs are often morphologically complex.

Barclay, Peter (2008).

Underspecification in Yawelmani phonology and morphology. Dissertation, MIT. Barclay, Peter. München: Lincom Europa. Aspects of the Theory of Syntax. While some nouns may have plural forms, normally the same form is used for both singular and plural.

Peter Barclay has 117 books on Goodreads, and is currently reading Captive on the Fens by Joy Ellis, Darkness on the Fens by Joy Ellis, and Murder at Wo. .Peter Barclay rated a book really liked it.

This book remains a classic, easily the most fascinating introduction to the field for anyone new to it, and also . Chris Wickham, University of Oxford.

This book remains a classic, easily the most fascinating introduction to the field for anyone new to it, and also capable of forcing experts into taking on new ideas; a summation of Peter Brown's mould-breaking work. Interpretations of late antiquity and of western Christendom have changed dramatically in the last decade. Gillian Clark, University of Bristol.

He has been honored by universities, institutions, and governments, for his entrepreneurial ability and benevolence and has served on International Boards with some of the world's greatest intellectual, business, academic, religious, and corporate giants of the 20th and 21st centuries. President and Founder, World Centre for Entrepreneurial Studies (1984). Created personal tutorial program on business (1988). Completed authorship of ten books (1989).

A Grammar of (Western) Garrwa Mushin provides the first full grammatical description of Garrwa, a.This book covers Garrwa phonology, morphology and syntax, with a particular focus on the use of grammar in discourse.

This book covers Garrwa phonology, morphology and syntax, with a particular focus on the use of grammar in discourse. The grammatical description is supplemented with a word list and text collection, including transcriptions of ordinary conversation.

This study presents a detailed description of the Western Dani language. All the word classes are discussed beginning with the nouns. While some nouns may have plural forms, normally the same form is used for both singular and plural. Possession is indicated by prefixes and there are a small number of suffixes marking such things as place and contents. Adjectives normally follow nouns and as well there is sophisticated array of intensifiers which modify both nouns and verbs. There are a relatively small number of verbs in Western Dani. Nominals may be used preceding verbs to give new meanings and as well, complex actions may be designated not by a separate verb but by joining together the various constituent simple actions. Verbs are often morphologically complex. Subjects are marked by suffixes and objects may be marked either by prefixes or inner suffixes. Depending on the type of object, verbs may be assigned objects from a particular object class, though any particular verb may accommodate objects from more than one of these classes. The language is structured according to the realis/irrealis distinction. A number of the more common verbs have a different root depending on the status. There is a far past which is used for events that are no longer considered relevant to the present, an intermediate past for events that have happened and a near past for events that have just happened and are regarded as complete. The present is used for events that are currently occurring. There are two intentive forms that are used depending on whether the intention is to act immediately or later on. Future forms are normally used for events that are considered very likely to occur. There is, as well, a sophisticated array of aspectual forms including habitual, continuous, durative and iterative.