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ePub The Journeying Boy: Scenes from a Welsh Childhood download

by Jon Manchip White

ePub The Journeying Boy: Scenes from a Welsh Childhood download
Author:
Jon Manchip White
ISBN13:
978-0916078447
ISBN:
0916078442
Language:
Publisher:
Iris Press; 2 edition (December 20, 1998)
Category:
ePub file:
1907 kb
Fb2 file:
1227 kb
Other formats:
doc lrf lit rtf
Rating:
4.4
Votes:
498

The Journeying Boy book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking The Journeying Boy: Scenes from a Welsh Childhood as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

The Journeying Boy book.

Jon Ewbank Manchip White (22 June 1924 – July 31, 2013) was the Welsh American author of more than thirty books of non-fiction and fiction, including The Last Race, Nightclimber, Death By Dreaming, Solo Goya.

Jon Ewbank Manchip White (22 June 1924 – July 31, 2013) was the Welsh American author of more than thirty books of non-fiction and fiction, including The Last Race, Nightclimber, Death By Dreaming, Solo Goya, and his final novel, Rawlins White: Patriot to Heaven, published in 2011. White was also the author of a number of plays, teleplays, screenplays and volumes of short stories and poetry.

The Journeying Boy is a beautifully crafted travelogue, a charming history of Wales, and a nostalgic look back at one man's varied . Journeying, Albeit Vicariously, with Professor White. com User, January 10, 2000

Journeying, Albeit Vicariously, with Professor White. com User, January 10, 2000. Professor White writes from the perspective of a man who, at his chronological prime, embarks on a period of introspection common to most everyone who reaches that station in life. As he rediscovers his Welsh roots, weaving legends and history among rich descriptions of Wales' people and scenery, Professor White draws readers into his idyllic native land.

The Journeying Boy. by. Jon Manchip White. White, Jon Ewbank Manchip, 1924- - Homes and haunts - Wales. White, Jon Ewbank Manchip, 1924- - Childhood and youth. Authors, Welsh - 20th century - Biography. Wales - Intellectual life - 20th century. Wales - Social life and customs. Wales - Description and travel. Atlantic Monthly Press.

Jon Manchip White returns to his native Wales for the first time in twenty years and discovers that time has . The Journeying Boy is a touching and evocative book, part autobiography, part family chronicle, part Welsh history, part travelogue

Jon Manchip White returns to his native Wales for the first time in twenty years and discovers that time has wrought immense change to this unusual and mysterious little country in the United Kingdom. While touring the country, White recounts his childhood in Cardiff, where his fore bears had lived since Norman times, spawning an entertaining crew of rich men and ne’er-do-wells, shipowners, sea captains, buccaneers, and murders. The Journeying Boy is a touching and evocative book, part autobiography, part family chronicle, part Welsh history, part travelogue. This is as it should be, for White is clearly a man of parts: novelist, historian, biographer, teacher, traveler. Scenes from a Welsh Childhood. by Jon Ewbank Manchip White. Published 1991 by Atlantic Monthly Press in New York, NY. Written in English. Social life and customs, In library, Description and travel, Welsh authors, Intellectual life, Homes and haunts, Childhood and youth, Biography, Welsh Authors.

White (Death by Decree, 1981, et. English/Univ. of Tenn A good deal of Welsh history, from the Bronze Age on, is thrown . takes a loving look at his boyhood home and comes up proud to be a Welshman. Born in Cardiff in 1924, and educated in English schools and universities in the 1930's and 40's, White views his Welsh nature and English nurture as a source of strength, providing a happy blend of romance and reality.

Robert Conquest (Author), Jon Manchip White (Author). In reading this book many people who assume that a leftist takeover would bring peace and enlightenment might be surprised that they might be one of the people who end up against the wall or in gulag for re-education. 4 people found this helpful.

Find nearly any book by Jon Ewbank Manchip White. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. Whistling Past the Churchyard: Strange Tales from a Superstitious Welshman. ISBN 9780871134875 (978-0-87113-487-5) Hardcover, Atlantic Monthly Pr, 1992.

"The Journeying Boy" is a beautifully crafted travelogue, a charming history of Wales, and a nostalgic look back at one man's varied and interesting life. Jon Manchip White returns to his native Wales for the first time in twenty years and discovers that time has wrought immense change to this unusual and mysterious little country in the United Kingdom.

While touring the country, White recounts his childhood in Cardiff, where his fore bears had lived since Norman times, spawning an entertaining crew of rich men and ne'er-do-wells, shipowners, sea captains, buccaneers, and murderers.

From Cardiff, White travels to the coal country of Glamorgan and the Black Mountains, introducing an amazing panoply of odd Welsh characters, past and present: from kings and queens, poets and writers, to warriors, coal miners, and seamen. At the heart of the story in the singular and tragic nature of the Welash race--their language, their religion, their passion for music and literature, their love of life, and their obsession with death.

  • You never know with a book like this - return of the 60-ish prodigal and expatriate to the scenes of his youth. Are you going to get an insightful and thoughtful tour of the author's childhood homeland or a self-indulgent recounting of the author's greatest hits and a string of gripes about how much better things used to be? Well, it seems to me that here you get a fair amount of both, with some ghost reckoning to boot, but it is done with a high degree of style and personality. Anyway, at least, early on, you can get a sense of which way the wind will blow in any particular chapter and you can guide your reading, skimming and outright skipping accordingly.

    I am happy to report that while there is a bit of that how-it-used-to-be-better posturing, and a bit more Manchip/White family history than I really needed, and some navel gazing about religion, and some score settling, for the much larger part our author plays fair with the reader and brings him along on a thoroughly engaging tour of this small country. White's travels and reminiscences center pretty much on Cardiff, (and especially the Docks that played a central role in his family's life), and the Glamorgan Valley. The first 100 pages or so of the book are devoted to a basic but thorough history of Wales, starting with the Beaker People and petering out with Owen Glendower. This is all schoolboy stuff for a Welshman, but I like to get everything back into my head when reading a book like this, and the history is lively and personable and serves as a solid orientation for the rest of the book.

    While the book is organized as a random sort of walk-about, individual chapters have a general theme. And so we take a stroll through what's left of Cardiff's port, we consider the appeal of rugby, we contemplate our relationship with God at Llandaff Cathedral. There isn't too much in the way of politics, (White was vocally right of center), and a lot of broad generalizing about Welsh character that is, I guess, the stock in trade of ex-pat memoirists.

    All of that said, this is generally a fond, affectionate, and evenhanded book full of high regard and admiration for the very best qualities of the Welsh character. When you add in a certain irascible charm, the combination won me over and I found myself enjoying this book even a bit more than I initially expected I would. A nice addition to the Wales shelf.

  • Professor White writes from the perspective of a man who, at his chronological prime, embarks on a period of introspection common to most everyone who reaches that station in life.
    As he rediscovers his Welsh roots, weaving legends and history among rich descriptions of Wales' people and scenery, Professor White draws readers into his idyllic native land. Professor White describes for readers the struggles he and his family faced during several generations in Wales. However, he does not focus on maudlin reminiscences or weigh the book down with potentially snobbish personal details. Rather, Professor White takes readers by the hand and invites them to join him from the first tenuous moments after he arrives in Cardiff until the end of his trip when he emerges as a different man, one who has stitched together several rent pieces of his soul.
    Professor White's style is extremely easy to read, and his descriptions of people and places make them literally come alive. The magnificent detail, coupled with an astounding ability to weave together the perfect words in his descriptions, give Professor White's prose incredible impact.
    The book's title, taken from a segment of Thomas Hardy's poem, Midnight on the Great Western, aptly describes Professor White's physical and spiritual journey on this short, but seminal trip.