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» » Maps and Legends: Reading and Writing Along the Borderlands[ MAPS AND LEGENDS: READING AND WRITING ALONG THE BORDERLANDS ] by Chabon, Michael (Author) Feb-24-09[ Paperback ]

ePub Maps and Legends: Reading and Writing Along the Borderlands[ MAPS AND LEGENDS: READING AND WRITING ALONG THE BORDERLANDS ] by Chabon, Michael (Author) Feb-24-09[ Paperback ] download

by Michael Chabon

ePub Maps and Legends: Reading and Writing Along the Borderlands[ MAPS AND LEGENDS: READING AND WRITING ALONG THE BORDERLANDS ] by Chabon, Michael (Author) Feb-24-09[ Paperback ] download
Author:
Michael Chabon
ISBN13:
978-0061720079
ISBN:
0061720070
Publisher:
Harper Perennial; 1St Edition edition (February 24, 2009)
Category:
ePub file:
1342 kb
Fb2 file:
1467 kb
Other formats:
mbr lit txt mobi
Rating:
4.9
Votes:
360

Maps and Legends book.

Maps and Legends book.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Find all the books, read about the author, and more. Are you an author? Learn about Author Central. Michael Chabon (Author).

But somewhere along the course of the past century or so, as the great machinery of. .The undoubted satisfactions that come from reading science fiction or mystery stories are to be enjoyed only in childhood or youth, or by the adult reader only as guilty pleasures (a phrase I loathe).

The undoubted satisfactions that come from reading science fiction or mystery stories are to be enjoyed only in childhood or youth, or by the adult reader only as guilty pleasures (a phrase I loathe).

Throughout, Chabon energetically argues for a return to the thrilling, chilling origins of storytelling, rejecting the false walls around "serious" literature in favor of a wide-ranging affection.

Michael Chabon is an acclaimed and bestselling author whose works include the Pulitzer Prize - winning novel The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay (2000). Born to two lawyers, Robert and Sharon, in Washington, DC, in 1963, Chabon was raised in Columbia, Maryland. As a young boy, he became interested in writing and storytelling through the.

Michael Chabon (b. 1963) is an acclaimed and bestselling author whose works include the Pulitzer Prize–winning novel The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay (2000)

Michael Chabon (b. 1963) is an acclaimed and bestselling author whose works include the Pulitzer Prize–winning novel The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay (2000). Chabon achieved literary fame at age twenty-four with his first novel, The Mysteries of Pittsburgh (1988), which was a major critical and commercial success. He then published Wonder Boys (1995), another bestseller, which was made into a film starring Michael Douglas.

Chabon is an accomplished fiction writer, having won the 2001 Pulitzer Prize for his novel "The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay.

In these intriguing essays, he strolls through this netherworld, taking up topics from golems to suburbia. Chabon is an accomplished fiction writer, having won the 2001 Pulitzer Prize for his novel "The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay.

I read for entertainment, and I write to entertain. Such is the manifesto of Michael Chabon, an author of indisputable literary renown who maintains a fierce appreciation of the seductive arts of so-called genre fiction. In this lively collection of sixteen critical and personal essays, the author of The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay champions the cause of westerns, horror, and all the stories, comics, and pulp fiction that get pushed aside when literary discussion turns serious.

Maps and Legends is an essay collection by American author Michael Chabon that was scheduled for official release on May 1, 2008, although some copies shipped two weeks early from various online bookstores. The book is Chabon's first book-length foray into nonfiction, with 16 essays, some previously published. Several of these essays are defenses of the author's work in genre literature (such as science fiction, fantasy, and comics), while others are more autobiographical, explaining how the author came to write several of his most popular works.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Maps and Legends: Reading and Writing Along . Good Vibes, Good Life How Self-Love Is The Key Unlocking Your Greatness by Vex King Paperback Book.

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  • This book consists of 17 essays about reading and writing. As the book’s title--also the title of the second essay--suggests, there’s an analogy drawn between story and a map, but—more importantly-- Chabon proposes that the literary domain is a realm with frontiers and hinterlands. The central theme is that there is room for great discoveries if we stray from the center of the map were all is clear and well-defined. Literary fiction is the center. The hinterlands include a range of genres and approaches to story-telling that are often maligned as low-brow—e.g. fan fiction and comic books.

    The book could be split into two parts, though the aforementioned theme cuts across all essays. The first 11 essays offer insight into maligned genres and their merits, but the next five shift gears into autobiographical telling of Chabon’s transformation into a writer. (The last essay, not present in some editions, could be seen as an epilogue to the entire work.) I’ll list the essays and give a hint about what each is about:

    -“Trickster in a Suit of Lights”: This essay invites us to reconsider the connection between entertainment and literature, and in particular with respect to the modern short story.

    -“Maps and Legends”: Here Chabon reflects upon the nature of a map and its analogy to the domain of fiction.

    -“Fan Fictions: On Sherlock Holmes”: Fan fiction is maligned, and not entirely without reason. Even when it achieves great popularity, it’s often bad (e.g. “Fifty Shades…”) However, Chabon correctly suggests that we consider fan fiction too narrowly, including only that which reinforces our notions. He offers a great example of a character, Sherlock Holmes, who launched a thousand fan fictions, some of which are masterpieces in their own right.

    -“Ragnarok Boy”: Mythology often seems tired and cliché, but there are reasons such stories survive across ages. Chabon explores what it is in Norse mythology that makes it an ongoing font of inspiration for writers.

    -“On Daemons & Dust”: For a while, YA was the only genre with rising sales--much to the chagrin of those who felt this might herald the rise of a real world idiocracy. In this essay, Chabon describes what it is about Philip Pullman’s “His Dark Materials” series of fantasy books that pulls readers in—including the appeal of dark elements in stories.

    -“Kids Stuff”: In this essay, Chabon considers the comic book and its evolution from kids’ stuff to a vast domain meant to appeal to a broad readership.

    -“The Killer Hook”: This essay continues Chabon’s look at comic books, but through a specific example: “American Flagg!” a dystopian sci-fi comic book. Chabon proposes that “American Flagg!” spawned a new approach to comic book art and tone.

    -“Dark Adventure”: This is about Cormac McCarthy’s “The Road.” Some topics are revisited, such as the appeal of dark and dystopian content. [For those unfamiliar, “The Road” is the story of a father and son wandering through a post-apocalyptic wasteland in search of some sort of stable community. McCarthy is the master of sparse prose, eschewing dialogue tags and maintaining a minimalist approach to his craft.

    -“The Other James”: Here Chabon discusses the ghost story, using M.R. James’ story “Oh, Whistle, and I’ll Come to You, My Lad” as an exemplar.

    -“The Landsman of the Lost”: Chabon discusses the comic strip work of Ben Katchor.

    -“Thoughts on the Death of Will Eisner”: Eisner was a popular cartoonist, associated with such comic books as, “The Spirit.”

    -“My Back Pages”: Here the book ventures into autobiographical territory as Chabon talks about his first dalliances with writing a novel.

    -“Diving into the Wreck”: This continues Chabon’s telling of how he came to be a writer, and his early troubles in structuring a novel.

    -“The Recipe for Life”: Here Chabon tells us about his introduction to Golems, a concept that would play an important role in one of his most influential works—an in the rest of the book. You’ll note the connection between fantastical devices and the telling of story that carries over from the first part.

    -“Imaginary Homelands”: Chabon describes the role that is played by culture in forming a writer’s experience—both the culture one is living in and the cultural heritage that we each carry with us wherever we may roam.

    -“Golems I Have Known”: This is one of the longer pieces and it presents the climax of Chabon’s tale of his transformation into a novelist. Golems as fictitious creatures built to facilitate certain truths are a central feature around which Chabon’s story is told.

    -“Secret Skin”: [Note: This essay didn’t appear in the initial version of the book, and so your edition might not have it.] This essay invites the reader to reconsider the role that costumes and secret identities play for superheroes and how that need resonates with readers. In the process, this last essay sums up the reason why fantastical elements are so powerful in fiction.

    There are only few graphics in the book, i.e. comic panels. Other than that there’s not much by way of ancillary matter, though there are recommended readings (oddly) interspersed within the index—rather than being a separate section.

    I’d recommend this book for readers and writers. The essays are well-crafted and thought provoking.

  • Mr. Chabon is certainly one of our best writers of fiction. This collection of essays explores his thoughts and feelings about his calling and his practice of it, salted with some notions about categorization and the effects thereof. Short version is that Michael Chabon loves so-called "genre" fiction, and wants to lift the stigma of "mere" entertainment attached to it. As interesting as these thoughts are - and they're well worth reading - his best shot at achieving the goal is to keep writing, both in the "literary" mode he does so well but also in the "genre" mode he's also mastered (see "Gentlemen of the Road" and "The Final Solution"). Having said that, I'll happily read anything he chooses to write; I'd just rather read his fiction than his essays. Let the work make its case.

  • When Michael Chabon came to Davidson during my time as student, in 2008, I took feverish notes on his lecture. His phrases were memorable as he described science fiction as the "transvestite cousin at Thanksgiving dinner, his fabulous hat studiously ignored" and talked about his run-in with Yiddish fanatics.

    Well, had I known that his talk -- and many other equally fantastic essays -- would be perfectly contained in Maps and Legends, I might have stopped compulsively taking notes and simply basked in his talk. This book is brilliant. Every essay offers a nugget of wisdom for people who feel torn at their love of genre fiction, or just resentful toward the academic establishment for discounting genre fiction books. Chabon has a knack for turning a clever phrase and sits at the border between academic writing and accessibility. He comes across as a genuine, likable writer -- not an easy feat.

    I definitely recommend this book.

  • I read the library copy of this book, then had to buy one for myself. Thought-provoking writing.

  • 4 Stars means: I really liked it and would recommend it to anyone.

    If Michael Chabon set out to write a collection of essays which sum up the feelings he has towards literature as a whole. He succeeds. Interwoven with the messages of literary theory are his own personal experiences with literature and the works of fiction he is discussing.

    From the first essay to the last there is something to enjoy in each one. Although some are more obscure (in subject matter not diction) they express a philosophy on what fiction should strive to be.

    Specifically the first two essays of the collection and the one about fictions limits and believability are valuable sources for any student of literature and especially creative writing, they should be read along with Gary Lutz "The Sentence is a Lonely Place" and many other similar works which express a deep understanding of fiction, but read a simple love letters to books as a whole.

    Now for why not five stars. For all its brilliance it still lacks in analysis. A few of the essays are of a lower quality than the others, which is to be expected of pretty much any collection of poetry, fiction or nonfiction. Overall to get a five star rating the book has to quite literally be among the best of everything I have read, and although this was a great read I would not give it a perfect score.

  • I love everything this guy writes.

  • Michael Chabon is a genius but he can talk over your head at times. However, he is fun to read and has interesting takes on the literary world.

  • If you like Chabon (and I usually do) you will like this book. And I'll admit I'm a sucker for anything that shines a light on a favorite author's thoughts, history and work habits. An easy and interesting read.