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ePub Lost Continents: The Atlantis Theme in History, Science, and Literature download

by Lyon Sprague De Camp

ePub Lost Continents: The Atlantis Theme in History, Science, and Literature download
Author:
Lyon Sprague De Camp
ISBN13:
978-0844605357
ISBN:
0844605352
Publisher:
Peter Smith Pub (March 1975)
Category:
ePub file:
1453 kb
Fb2 file:
1580 kb
Other formats:
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Rating:
4.5
Votes:
856

Lost Continents: The Atlantis Theme in History, Science, and Literature is a study by L. Sprague de Camp. It is considered one of his most popular works.

Lost Continents: The Atlantis Theme in History, Science, and Literature is a study by L. It was written in 1948, and first published serially in the magazine Other Worlds Science Fiction in 1952-1953; portions also appeared as articles in Astounding Science Fiction, Galaxy Science Fiction, Natural History Magazine, and the Toronto Star.

by De Camp & Lyon Sprague. advantages in the marketplace and in science and technology have begun to erode. The greatest of richness is the richness of the soul. ― Prophet Muhammad (Peace be upon him). 06 MB·70,034 Downloads·New! science or engineering was, and why the development of these fields was so important to the future. 53 MB·76,326 Downloads·New!

Formerly published as Lost Continents: The Atlantis Theme in History, Science, and Literature. Ballantine books, new york.

Lost Continents book

Lost Continents book. A leading authority examines the facts and fancies behind the Atlantis theme in history, science, and literature. Lyon Sprague de Camp, (Pseudonym: Lyman R. Lyon) was an American science fiction and fantasy author and biographer.

Sprague de Camp, a SFWA Grand Master and winner of the World Fantasy Award for Life Achievement, wrote the definitive biography of Conan's creator, Robert E. Howard. De Camp died in 2000. Библиографические данные. Lost Continents: The Atlantis Theme in History, Science, and Literature Dover Occult Series Dover books Wiley series in financial engineering.

Excellent history of such legendary continents as Atlantis and Lemuria. Though Plato is our only primary source on Atlantis, much of our idea of it was contributed by Ignatius Donnelly in the mid 19th cy. A bit behind the times about continental drift, as to be expected. One person found this helpful.

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A leading authority examines the facts and fancies behind the Atlantis theme in history, science, and literature. Sources include the classical works from which Plato drew his proposal of the existence of an island continent, Sir Thomas More's Utopia, the Lemurian Continent theory, . Frost's equation of Atlantis with Crete, and many other citations of Atlantis in both famous and lesser-known literature. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

fancies behind the Atlantis theme in history, science, and literature.

Read Lost Continents, by Lyon Sprague de Camp online on Bookmate – A leading authority examines the facts and fancies behind the Atlantis theme in history, science, and literature. Sources include the classical works from which Plato drew his proposal of the existence of an island continent, Sir Thomas More's Utopia, the Lemurian Continent theory, K. T. L. Sprague de Camp enjoyed debunking doubtful history and pseudoscientific claims. The work provides a detailed examination of theories and speculations on Atlantis and other lost lands, including the scientific arguments against their existence and how it has been continued, developed and imitated by later theorists, speculators, scientific enquirers, enthusiasts, occultists, quacks, and fantasists throughout history.

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  • I found this to be an excellent book although the author refutes the various legends and myths concerning the Lost Continent of Atlantis. The book makes numerous valid points with which to support the conclusion that Atlantis did not exist but was rather an elaborate story by Plato who took poetic license in order to write a detailed story. The absence of any solid evidence to the contrary is rather one sided. References to other supporting works are given throughout the text and I plan on reading some of this material, particularly since they represent the opposing side of the argument. It is a good book and worth reading for anyone interested in this subject as it places the story into a scientific perspective.

  • L. Sprague de Camp really puts the Lost Worlds genre into perspective. Reading this might rob the fun out of the stories for you.

  • Excellent history of such legendary continents as Atlantis and Lemuria. Though Plato is our only primary source on Atlantis, much of our idea of it was contributed by Ignatius Donnelly in the mid 19th cy. A bit behind the times about continental drift, as to be expected.

  • Very interesting book

  • This is the classic tool for debunking the whole Atlantis legend. Though this edition is over 40 years old, it still is the go to volume to disprove the "reality" of Atlantis (or Mu or Lemuria, for that matter) Well written, well thought out, well worth the time, though some of the information about deciphering Mayan glyphs is now dated.

  • Take off the tinfoil hat, folks. This is a serious and scholarly study of the history of the Atlantis myth. By the end of this classic, the reader will have a pretty thorough insight into what the myth is, who espoused it, where it was seen in literature, the science of Atlantis, the history of the world, creation theories, and numerous other approaches to the Atlantis myth. And, if the reader actually believes the Platonic Atlantis literally after reading this book, they didn't read it. You will understand allegory, ancient storytelling, and the use of historical parallels (like the Santorini explosion) to form the basis for the myth. A slow starter by this book is a great literary and historical resource on Atlantis in myth and literature.

  • If you read lost world novels, this is worth reading.

  • This is a crabby book that attempts to refute the legend of Atlantis and other lost continents with whatever method it can muster - geology, geography, literature and "scientific." It doesn't quite live up to it's reputation, although it has a lot of interesting maps in it and makes some good points about continental drift and other scientific theories. On the one hand, de Camp has done a lot of research for it and brings to light, although I am sure unintentionally, some valuable history on how the Atlantis story came into being (mainly references to it before and after Plato). His conclusions on what scholars knew and thought at the time are subjective at best, though and, since the book was written back in 1954 and only slightly revised in 1970, according to the jacket, much of the points he makes abour scientific research are now dated.
    The main fault in the book lies in the title itself. De Camp's main points are that a continent as big as Atlantis was reputed to be couldn't have sunk, but the original account from Plato didn't clearly call Atlantis a continent, and there is plenty of evidence of similar land masses of this smaller type sinking (some brought up by de Camp himself in the book, like the island of Krakatow). Since none if us were alive in the past, how can any of us be certain what the land masses looked like then..? His other point is that people were not even advanced enough to have built Atlantis back in 9,600 b.c. (he describes our ancestors as "sitting on a branch and scratching" at that time). De Camp, at the time anyway, seems to have bought wholesale into the Darwin theory of evolution, which, we know now, has plenty of holes. These days, as more discoveries have been unearthed, the date for human civilization is being pushed back more and more. Ruins have been found on Malta that date to 8,000 b.c. and even the Sphinx has been redated, albeit not by everyone, to 10,000 b.c. Underwater ruins discovered off of Cuba have been dated to 15,000, even 30,000 b.c. Also, I am shocked by how little research was done when trying to dispute the most popular theory of Atlantis - the Atlantis sinking beneath the Atlantic theory (a scientist friend of his lowered his camera down by the Mid-Atlantic Ridge with a camera and didn't see any ruins there) ...
    His evidence to dispute linguistic evidence of Atlantis, as well as Atlantis and the Mayans connection, all needs more time to answer than I care to give here, other than to say, he is very selective about the examples he gives to prove his case. His research into the almost equally legendary isle Antillia actually proves it's existence rather than disproves it the closer one looks at it. And there are many other parts where de Camp simply dismisses a whole researcher's body of work by calling them loonies (this from a guy who for the most part made his name writing Conan the Barbarian novels, some of which starts out "before the oceans drank Atlantis...").
    A cynical work that brings forth the occasional good point about Atlantis, perhaps the bible for the anti-Atlantis people.