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ePub Aboriginal self-government: Rights of citizenship and access to governmental services (Aboriginal peoples and constitutional reform) download

by Noel Lyon

ePub Aboriginal self-government: Rights of citizenship and access to governmental services (Aboriginal peoples and constitutional reform) download
Author:
Noel Lyon
ISBN13:
978-0889114227
ISBN:
0889114226
Language:
Publisher:
Institute of Intergovernmental Relations (1984)
Category:
ePub file:
1915 kb
Fb2 file:
1963 kb
Other formats:
txt azw doc docx
Rating:
4.8
Votes:
343

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Aboriginal self-government refers to proposals to give governments representing .

Aboriginal self-government refers to proposals to give governments representing the Aboriginal peoples of Canada greater powers of government. Aboriginal peoples in Canada are defined in the Constitution Act, 1982 as Indians, Inuit and Metis. The constitutional amendments of 1982 included Section 35 which recognized Aboriginal rights and treaty rights but did not define these. In 1983, the Special Committee of the House of Commons on Indian Self-Government, released its report (also called the Penner Report after committee chair Keith Penner).

Aboriginal self-government by Noel Lyon, 1984, Institute of Intergovernmental . Aboriginal peoples and constitutional reform. no. 1. Classifications. 34. 1/0872, 34. 0282.

Published 1984 by Institute of Intergovernmental Relations in Kingston, Ont Aboriginal peoples and constitutional reform. xi, 70, 46 p. ; Number of pages.

Aboriginal Peoples and Constitutional Reform: What Have We Learned?

Aboriginal Peoples and Constitutional Reform: What Have We Learned?.

The Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples (RCAP) was a Canadian Royal Commission established in 1991 to address many issues of Aboriginal status that had come to light with recent events such as the Oka Crisis and the Meech Lake Accord. The commission culminated in a final report of 4,000 pages, published in 1996. The original report "set out a 20-year agenda for implementing changes.

Aboriginal rights are collective rights which flow from Aboriginal peoples’ continued use and occupation of certain . It is difficult to specifically list these rights, as Aboriginal peoples and the Canadian government may hold differing views.

Aboriginal rights are collective rights which flow from Aboriginal peoples’ continued use and occupation of certain areas. They are inherent rights which Aboriginal peoples have practiced and enjoyed since before European contact. Some rights that Aboriginal peoples have practiced and recognized for themselves have not been recognized by the Crown.

Despite a rich literature on the political and constitutional development of the Canadian territorial North, few scholars have examined the post-devolution environment in Yukon.

Chapter 3 government obligations, aboriginal peoples and section 91(24) of the .

Chapter 3 government obligations, aboriginal peoples and section 91(24) of the constitution act, 1867. With respect to government roles and responsibilities, it is important to distinguish between government jurisdiction and government responsibility. While this point is applicable to any field of government activity, it is particularly important for aboriginal peoples, since they are identified in the Constitution, in . 1(24), as a federal head of power.

Aboriginal self-government has had different developments in history, one during the Indian Act 1876 which enacted Bands . Treaty: Treaties were a common way of negotiation between Aboriginal peoples and the Crown/ government in Canadian history.

Aboriginal self-government has had different developments in history, one during the Indian Act 1876 which enacted Bands- supposed to replace traditional forms of Aboriginal self government. This was a violation of traditional Aboriginal government, but was seen as being better than giving up all their rights. This means that many agreements between the government and the Aboriginals lay in treaties, and the degree of their importance has changed throughout history.