mostraligabue
» » The Confessions of Catherine de Medici

ePub The Confessions of Catherine de Medici download

ePub The Confessions of Catherine de Medici download
ISBN13:
978-0340962961
ISBN:
0340962968
Language:
Publisher:
Hodder & Stoughton Ltd; Export ed edition
Category:
ePub file:
1478 kb
Fb2 file:
1401 kb
Other formats:
txt mobi lrf doc
Rating:
4.4
Votes:
578

Catherine de Medici uses her natural and supernatural gifts to protect the French throne in Gortner's (The Last Queen) .

Catherine de Medici uses her natural and supernatural gifts to protect the French throne in Gortner's (The Last Queen) portrait of a queen willing to sacrifice happiness and reputation to fulfill her family's royal destiny. Orphan Catherine has her first vision at age 10, and three years later is betrothed to Henri d'Orleans, brother of the sickly heir to the French throne. Michelle Moran, author of Nefertiti "The Confessions of Catherine de Medici is a dramatic, epic novel of an all-too-human woman whose strength and passion propelled her into the center of grand events.

Caterina Romelo de’ Medici, can it be you’ve finished already? I looked up. My late father’s sister Clarice de’ Medici y Strozzi regarded me from her chair. Other author's books: The Confessions of Catherine de Medici. I wiped my brow with my sleeve. It’s so hot in here, I said. Can’t I go outside? She arched her eyebrow. Even before she said anything, I could have recited her words, so often had she drummed them into my head: You are the Duchess of Urbino, daughter of Lorenzo de’ Medici and his wife, Madeleine de la Tour, who was of noble French blood  .

So reveals Catherine de Medici in this brilliantly imagined novel about one . The opening line of The Confessions of Catherine de Medici is simple yet powerful: "The truth is, none of us are innocent.

So reveals Catherine de Medici in this brilliantly imagined novel about one of history’s most powerful and controversial women. To some she was the ruthless queen who led France into an era of savage violence. To others she was the passionate savior of the French monarchy. I have read TONS of historical fiction books including texts on Catherine and this is one of the best works to ever truly bring her alive. I honestly felt like I was sitting right there with Catherine de Medici as she told me her life style. We all have sins to confess.

What have you learned from reading The Confessions of Catherine de Medici about the sixteenth .

What have you learned from reading The Confessions of Catherine de Medici about the sixteenth century, French history, and Catherine herself? Unless otherwise stated, this discussion guide is reprinted with the permission of Ballantine Books. Membership Advantages.

From the royal chateaux of the Loire to the blood-soaked Wars of Religion and intrigue-laden halls of the Louvre, Catherine de Medici fights for the embattled throne. Historical Novel Society North America. 1,104 Followers · Community Organization.

We returned to Paris with my son’s corpse, where he was handed over to the embalmers and Mary, our widow queen, was escorted by her Guise relatives to her cloister in the Hôtel de Cluny.

We returned to Paris with my son’s corpse, where he was handed over to the embalmers and Mary, our widow queen, was escorted by her Guise relatives to her cloister in the Hôtel de Cluny frozen hush descended, mirroring the December snows blanketing Paris. I moved at once to protect Charles and my other children.

So reveals Catherine de Medici in this brilliantly imagined novel about one of history's most powerful and controversial women. Gortner brings Catherine to life in her own voice, allowing us to enter into the intimate world of a woman whose determination to protect her family's throne and realm plunged her into a lethal struggle for power.

Автор: Gortner C. W. Название: The Confessions of Catherine de. .Описание: THE TUDOR VENDETTA is the final book in the ELIZABETH& SPYMASTER trilogy.

So reveals Catherine de Medici, the last legitimate descendant of her family s illustrious line. Expelled from her native Florence, Catherine is betrothed to Henri, son of Francois I of France.

So reveals Catherine de Medici, the last legitimate descendant of her family’s illustrious line. An excerpt from The Confessions of Catherine de Medici. Chapter One. I was ten years old when i discovered i might be a witch. Expelled from her native Florence, Catherine is betrothed to Henri, son of François I of France. In an unfamiliar realm, Catherine strives to create a role for herself through her patronage of the famous clairvoyant Nostradamus and her own innate gift as a seer. But in her fortieth year, Catherine is widowed, left alone with six young children in a kingdom torn apart by the ambitions of a treacherous nobility.

  • Catherine de Medicis was queen of France for more than a half century, from her wedding in 1533 to Henry de Valois, to her death in 1589.
    She was the wife of one king, Henry II, the mother of three others, François II, Charles IX and Henry III.
    It is a good book to read, as it provides an overview of a long period of history, full of events.
    But possibly, the author attempted too much, and tried to cover too long a period with insufficient depth.
    The book is placed in the grey zone between history, with a capital H, hard facts and old documents, and fiction which gives liberty to the author to phantasies about what might or might not have been. And sometime the reader is left in doubt : was Catherine actually the lover, if only for one night, to the Admiral de Coligny ? This is a key hypothesis in understanding later events, including the massacre of the St Barthelemy when Coligny died, possibly on the direct orders of the queen. I don’ t know, and I doubt it.
    And, sometime, the author crosses a dangerous line, when he describes events that did not take place : for instance, at the time of the death of his brother Charles IX, Henry, Duke of Anjou and the future Henry III, was definitely not in Savoy, but in Cracow, having been elected king by the polish nobility: this is a well-known fact ! Writing otherwise is misleading the reader !
    The author would be well advised to be more diligent in proofreading his text which includes obviously inaccurate places, times, dates and distances.

  • Catherine de Medici is one of those historical characters whose reputation is so tarnished that it's hard to imagine any redemption for her. At the same time, what exactly was her role as queen mother? C.W. Gortner chose an interesting title for this book, because we pick it up knowing that she is getting a chance to explain her side of the story. As such, we know it's going to be biased in her favor, and the author's challenge is to make her excuses believable while not going too far in the other direction. It was a very interesting task, and I think he pulled it off well.

    Thrust into an uncomfortable royal marriage where her friends were few and she was surrounded by derision, Catherine's first difficulty was establishing a presence in a court where mistresses held power (including her husband Henry II's famous Diane of Poitiers) and political factions could mean life or death. But Catherine was a de Medici, and her family was skilled in this sort of environment. She did manage to build a powerful faction of her own and even gained the approbation (love?) of her husband, giving him ten children. However, she accused his mistress of taking the children away from her, so their dubious personalities were not of her making. By the time she took control of her childrens' lives, the damage had already been done. They were a weak and unruly bunch, and always seemed to be causing profound difficulties.

    Henry's untimely death left a sickly 15 year-old Francis II as heir, and she managed to become regent for him; but he died within a year. Ten year-old Charles followed and a third son Henry was crowned 14 years after him. It seems that Catherine essentially acted a regent all along, and her focus became the survival of the Valois line through many civil wars and religious upheaval. It must have been a terrible time.

    Catherine's methods were not always kind, and she is saddled with some pretty nasty accusations including orchestrating the St. Bartholomew's Day Massacre. Gortner seems to disagree that she was responsible, though Catherine admits to having made some bad decisions that led to the disaster. It could be that in those tempestuous days, there were no good decisions. It's possible that without her hand at the helm, the dynasty would have fallen to the treacherous de Guise faction. Some of Catherine's defenses seemed weak, and it is possible that she sometimes took the blame on her shoulders that more rightly belonged elsewhere. Or was she merely clouding the issues? The problems seemed always to be caused by someone else and she had to find the solutions. Then again, that could well be how we always see ourselves. The book flowed well and was an interesting read.

  • I enjoyed this novel from the viewpoint of Catherine de Medici. It wasn't the most gripping or fast-paced novel that I've read, nor did I have too much of an emotional attachment to the characters, but I did enjoy reading from Catherine's perspective. Previously every novel that I have read about this period has cast Catherine in a very negative light. For example, the historical fantasy series by Susan Carroll and also a particular favourite of mine by Diane Haegar, "Courtesan", about Diane de Poitiers.
    This novel goes far in changing the perception of certain events by giving them from Catherine's perspective. By using his fictional license C.W. Gortner has not painted his protagonist with a broad brush, rather he has shown her to be a complex woman who is not purely saint or sinner. One particular feature I liked was that he has made Catherine completely aware of her sordid reputation. Yet she does not fight against it, rather she strives forward in her effort to protect and strengthen her adopted homeland. Gortner has made it as if Catherine is speaking to us through the ages, as if she is aware of what her reputation will be to future generations as well as in her present day.
    However, this is not to say that this is a novel in which Catherine is constantly defending herself to the reader, rather she is showing things in a matter-of-fact way. It is almost like she is saying to the reader; "this is what happened, these were my limited choices, this is what I did". It was due to this that I found this to be an interesting read. I didn't connect to Catherine as a character, but I most definitely did respect her.

  • In an attempt to maintain an air of historical accuracy, the author did very little to dispute the omnipresent notoriety commonly associated with Catherine de Medici. This was touted as historical fiction but simply lacked the usual imagination and dramatic flair one would expect from this sort of work. The retelling was one dimensional and made Medici out to be more martyr and misunderstood regent than the notorious figure history has us believe. Overall a disappointing read....reminded me more of someone trying to fictionalize a contemporary head of state who is concerned with lawsuits for libel and slander.