mostraligabue
» » Shadows On The Hudson

ePub Shadows On The Hudson download

by Isaac Bashevis; Translated by Sherman Joseph Singer

ePub Shadows On The Hudson download
Author:
Isaac Bashevis; Translated by Sherman Joseph Singer
ISBN13:
978-0140273212
ISBN:
0140273212
Language:
Publisher:
Plume / Penguin Books; 1st Thus. edition (1999)
Category:
ePub file:
1590 kb
Fb2 file:
1182 kb
Other formats:
rtf lrf mobi rtf
Rating:
4.8
Votes:
725

Although Isaac Bashevis Singer emigrated from Poland to the United States in 1935, the circumscribed world of. .Now it has finally been translated into English-in a capable version by Joseph Sherman-and Singer fans should be very grateful

Although Isaac Bashevis Singer emigrated from Poland to the United States in 1935, the circumscribed world of the Polish Jews remained at the heart of his imagination. Now it has finally been translated into English-in a capable version by Joseph Sherman-and Singer fans should be very grateful. Center stage is occupied by Boris Makaver, a master builder equally devoted to I-beams and the Talmud, and Anna, his much-married daughter.

Isaac Bashevis Singer. Shosha is a hauntingly lyrical love story set in Jewish Warsaw on the eve of its annihilation. Isaac Bashevis Singer. Aaron Greidinger, an aspiring Yiddish writer and the son of a distinguished Hasidic rabbi, struggles to be true to his art when faced with the chance at riches and a passport to America. The forty-seven stories in this collection, selected by Singer himself out of nearly one hundred and fifty, range from the publication of his now-classic first collection, Gimpel the Fool, in 1957, until 1981.

Shadows on the Hudson (original title Shotns baym Hodson ) is a novel by Isaac Bashevis Singer. First serialized in The Forward, a Yiddish newspaper, it was published in book form in 1957. It was translated into English by Joseph Sherman in 1998. The book follows a group of prosperous Jewish refugees in New York City following World War II, just prior to the founding of the state of Israel.

Isaac Bashevis Singer; Translated by Joseph Sherman. A piercing work of fiction with a strong claim to being Singer's masterpiece" (Richard Bernstein, The New York Times), Shadows on the Hudson traces the intertwined lives of a group of Jewish refugees in New York City in the late 1940s. Farrar, Straus and Giroux. A chain of events disrupts the lives of the close-knit community as each refugee struggles to reconcile the horrific past with the difficult present, as Singer explores both the nature of faith and the nature of love in the aftermath.

We’re dedicated to reader privacy so we never track you.

Isaac Bashevis Singer (Yiddish: יצחק באַשעװיס זינגער‎; November 21, 1902 – July 24, 1991) was a Polish-American writer in Yiddish, awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1978. The Polish form of his birth name was Icek Hersz Zynger

Isaac Bashevis Singer (Yiddish: יצחק באַשעװיס זינגער‎; November 21, 1902 – July 24, 1991) was a Polish-American writer in Yiddish, awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1978. The Polish form of his birth name was Icek Hersz Zynger. He used his mother's first name in an initial literary pseudonym, Izaak Baszewis, which he later expanded. He was a leading figure in the Yiddish literary movement, writing and publishing only in Yiddish. He was also awarded two .

Shadows on the Hudson book. Nobel Prize-winning author Isaac Bashevis Serialized in the late 1950s, "Shadows on the Hudson" was translated from Yiddish and published posthumously as a complete novel in 1998, receiving widespread literary acclaim. From the Upper West Side to Miami's pastel resorts, Shadows on the Hudson traces the intertwined destiny of survivors in the aftermath of the Holocaust.

Although Isaac Bashevis Singer emigrated from Poland to the United States in 1935, the circumscribed world of. It was translated into English by Joseph Sherman in 1998

Shadows on the Hudson (original title Shotns baym Hodson ) is a novel by Isaac Bashevis Singer. v. t. e. Works by Isaac Bashevis Singer.

Author: Isaac Bashevis Singer, Jane Bobko, Jospeh Sherman, Robert Giro ISBN 10: 0140273212. Title: Shadows On the Hudson Item Condition: used item in a good condition

Author: Isaac Bashevis Singer, Jane Bobko, Jospeh Sherman, Robert Giro ISBN 10: 0140273212. Title: Shadows On the Hudson Item Condition: used item in a good condition. Published On: 1999-06-24 SKU: 8765-9780140273212. From United KingdomFormat: PaperbackAuthor: Isaac Bashevis SingerPublisher: Penguin Books. Satan in Goray by Singer, Isaac Bashevis Paperback Book The Cheap Fast Free Post. Author:Singer, Isaac Bashevis.

  • For fans of Singer's writing, there is little new here. All of his classical narrative concerns are on display. But this novel, unpublished during his lifetime, is far more of an immense and deep exploration of his concerns; there is the feeling, when reading this sprawling novel, that he has found yet another angle to explore his fictional concerns, and it is one that is subterranean in its aesthetic. Shadows is staggeringly dark; its vision of humanity, both in the past, present and future, is unremittingly tragic and sorrowful. Singer never lets up, and reading this novel can be fatiguing because of its unrelenting stance toward despair. What saves the novel from perdition, what makes it more than a catalog of gloom, is that it is uttering extremely simple truths, even if they are hard to swallow.

  • good read

  • It's true that that the characters exist for the purpose of delivering long philosophical rants decrying the
    their existence along with everyone else they know. Of course this story takes place in the shadow of the
    holocaust which effects their every moment of their existence. It was understandably impossible for them
    to form relationships, or experience happiness based on the unspeakable trauma they experienced.
    They escaped the holocaust but the ghosts but they were driven by the ghosts of the past.
    This was a very heavy book and I felt relief when it was over. Would not recommend if
    you have a history of depression.

  • "Shadows on the Hudson" is an excellent novel, even better than Singer's similiar but more compact "Enemies, a Love Story". Few writers have ever been able to involve the reader in the inner lives of fictional characters the way Singer could, and fewer still would have been able to make their stories so fascinating when they're all so cynical and often downtrodden, bemoaning God's silence and the corruption of modern man. Singer had a singular talent for exploring the chasm between expectations and reality, how we're almost always let down (and the post-WW2 Jews moreso than practically anyone in history), and how, for some totally inexplicable reason, we keep going. He made the absurd palpable for the modern reader, far better than even Camus and Sartre did, because he was an entertaining storyteller first, and THEN he was a philosopher.

    This long, convoluted story of the lives of a half-dozen Jewish intellectuals and businesspeople in New York immediately after the second world war must be Singer's masterpiece. He often explored the same ideas in his novels---the point of existence and the role of the Jew in modern society---and in fact he often used philandering husbands and bitter wives and mistresses as primary characters, but he pulled it all together here into a riveting, beautiful story of obsession, regret, pain, and penitence that you simply don't want to end. That these people, and their endless torturous questions, aren't really important in the long run is precisely the final point of Singer's big novel: we make a tiny, swift ripple in the river and then we're gone, possibly forever; but it is how we grapple with the desires of the body and the needs of the mind and heart that gives our lives substance and form. Without this questioning and searching, without this rending of our spirit by apparently random or viscious events in our lives...without all of it, we would never turn to God. And then our small lives ARE meaningless.

    At least, that's what I think Singer is trying to say. In the end, he was a fantastic writer who drew you into the story and kept you guessing until the end. Just like life itself...

  • This is a long, deep novel that deals with some of the fundamental problems of human existence. More than any other writer, Singer (at least in this book) reminds me of Dostoyevsky, whose characters were constantly in existentialist turmoil over questions such as good vs. evil and whether or not there is a God (and if there is, is He good, evil or indifferent?) Of course, while Dostoyevsky was a Christian, all of the characters in Shadows on the Hudson are Jewish holocaust survivors who have recently emigrated to New York from Europe shortly after World War ll. This is something that none of them can forget, even for a day, as many barely escaped while their loved ones perished. Beyond this confrontation with evil and death, the novel is largely about the philosophical war between religious orthodoxy and hedonistic modern life. Contemporary readers who do not come from a strongly religious background may have some difficulty appreciating this dilemma. The mass culture that Singer found vulgar and amoral in the 50s has now all but taken over in America, leaving many people no frame of reference for any other type of existence. While there is much philosophizing, Singer succeeds in creating flesh and blood characters whose moral anguish is not simply abstract, but put to the test in daily life. The character we spend the most time with is Hertz Grein, a middle-aged man whose religious yearnings are in stark contrast to his lifestyle. He is a married man who has had a long affair with another woman. As the novel opens, he is preparing to run off with yet another woman. Grein's behavior through most of this book is both irrational and indefensible. He lies to all three women, and makes all his decisions on the whim of the moment. At the same time, he is hardly without a conscience. On the contrary, he is deeply ashamed of the pain he causes others and desperately wants to redeem himself. Reading Shadows on the Hudson, I got the feeling that Singer himself, as he wrote the book, was struggling with the very issues faced by Grein and his other, equally fascinating and conflicted characters. The central problem posed by the book is the paradox of faith. On the one hand, there is no evidence that God exists. Indeed, the prevalence of suffering and evil suggests an indifferent universe. On the other hand, life without faith is unbearable and leads to a world without meaning or values. Does this mean that we should, even in the absence of evidence, embrace a strict moral code? Although the conclusion of Shadows on the Hudson is somewhat ambiguous, Singer seems to answer this question tentatively in the affirmative. Whether or not you agree (I actually don't), the question is an extremely important one and this book gets to the core of it.