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ePub Eight Cousins (Complete and Unabridged Classics) download

by Louisa May Alcott

ePub Eight Cousins (Complete and Unabridged Classics) download
Author:
Louisa May Alcott
ISBN13:
978-0816704620
ISBN:
0816704627
Language:
Publisher:
Troll Communications Llc (February 1, 1985)
Category:
Subcategory:
Literature & Fiction
ePub file:
1763 kb
Fb2 file:
1582 kb
Other formats:
rtf lit lrf azw
Rating:
4.4
Votes:
818

Louisa May Alcott (November 29, 1832 – March 6, 1888) was an American novelist and poet best known as the author of the novel Little Women (1868) and its sequels Little Men (1871) and Jo's Boys (1886).

The Author is quite aware of the defects of this little story, many ofwhich were unavoidable, as it first appeared serially

The Author is quite aware of the defects of this little story, many ofwhich were unavoidable, as it first appeared serially. I can sing, but nothing half so fine as that. What is your name, please?" "Phebe Moore. I've heard of phebe-birds; but I don't believe the real ones could dothat," laughed Rose, adding, as she watched with interest the scatteringof dabs of soft soap over the bricks, "May I stay and see you work? Itis very lonely in the parlor. Yes, indeed, if you want to," answered Phebe, wringing out her cloth ina capable sort of way that impressed Rose very much.

Classic Louisa May Alcott but one of her lesser known works.

But it does come close, don't get me wrong. The scenes on the little island out at sea, or in the big houses on the green "Aunt-Hill" near the beach where the whole Campbell clan lives, or in Rose's exotic tropical bedroom, or on the skating pond in the freezing winter, create special feelings in my heart that are as fond memories as if I'd really been there. Classic Louisa May Alcott but one of her lesser known works.

The sequel to Eight Cousins, Rose In Blue follows the cousins as they grow up. Written as cleanly and delicately as Alcott's other works, we follow Rose, Mac, Charlie, Phoebe and the rest of the family on Aunt Hill through adolescence to their adult success, and it's every bit as engaging and heart-warming as Eight Cousins was. Even after decades of life, and a half dozen reads or so, this book still makes me tear up in places, and I am not ashamed to admit that in the least.

Part of Eight Cousins series by Louisa May Alcott. And well it might, for a mostengaging little warrior was Jack as he lay with his shako half off, hischildish face trying to keep sober, and a great black moustache over hisrosy mouth

Part of Eight Cousins series by Louisa May Alcott. And well it might, for a mostengaging little warrior was Jack as he lay with his shako half off, hischildish face trying to keep sober, and a great black moustache over hisrosy mouth. It would have softened the heart of any Napoleon, and theLittle Corporal proved himself a man by relenting, and saying, with alofty gesture of forgiveness

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Louisa May Alcott was born in Germantown, Pennsylvania, in 1832. Eight Cousins Complete and Unabridged Classics Watermill Classic. Two years later, she moved with her family to Boston and in 1840 to Concord, which was to remain her family home for the rest of her life. Her father, Bronson Alcott, was a transcendentalist and friend of Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry David Thoreau. Alcott early realized that her father could not be counted on as sole support of his family, and so she sacrificed much of her own pleasure to earn money by sewing, teaching, and churning out potboilers.

But in 1875, Alcott published Eight Cousins, a predictable, bathetic novel featuring a ridiculously plucky orphan named Rose Campbell and her seven boy cousins; except for Mac, all of them would make Pollyanna appear a spoiled, selfish misanthrope. It’s no Little Women by a long shot. The story began well enough, with Rose mourning the death of her beloved invalid father. Her I never knew that Louisa May Alcott ever wrote anything other than Little Women, its sequels and some scary stories.

Narrated by Maria Therese. Eight Cousins, or The Aunt Hill' was published in 1875 by American novelist Louisa May Alcott.

Genre: ClassicsFormat: PaperbackAuthor: Louisa May Alcott. Little Women (Collins Classics) By Louisa May Alcott

Genre: ClassicsFormat: PaperbackAuthor: Louisa May Alcott. Little Women (Collins Classics) By Louisa May Alcott.

Eight Cousins (Complete and Unabridged Classics)
  • Most YA books of a modern turn would have had Rose rush about flirting like mad and knocking down walls with her fists in her ardor to be independent and find love. But, the lost art of writing a pleasant character whose only wish is to be worth something and to love someone worth loving is not found in most modern fiction. LM Alcott writes with firm, frank beliefs that are openly expressed and understood: Women should be independent but not harsh; Men should be driven and not dissipate; Children should be loved and not neglected; And, life should be lived uprightly to the best extent of your gifts and not lazily to the disparaging of your talents. Most of all, she wants her readers to know that love isn't always the grand illusion that we build for ourselves, and the handsome hopes we have don't always happen, much to our betterment in some cases, that the ordinary and good is surprisingly the best option. All in all, this is what every young person should read, for good character and honesty is overlooked in today's society for quick wit mixed with malice and originality to the great chagrin of us all.

    My only criticism is the treatment of Fun See. However, for the time period it was VERY progressive for Alcott to marry him to a well-to-do American girl, she showed great ignorance in her writing of the character, which, to be fair, was the common treatment of anyone Asian.

  • The sequel to Eight Cousins, Rose In Blue follows the cousins as they grow up. Written as cleanly and delicately as Alcott's other works, we follow Rose, Mac, Charlie, Phoebe and the rest of the family on Aunt Hill through adolescence to their adult success, and it's every bit as engaging and heart-warming as Eight Cousins was.

    Even after decades of life, and a half dozen reads or so, this book still makes me tear up in places, and I am not ashamed to admit that in the least. The book recalls a time and culture that were cleaner and simpler in many ways than what we have now, and turning the pages is like going back in time--I have so many happy memories tied up with this book, and others I enjoyed as a young girl.

    You won't find all the tools modern authors use to hold attention here--violence, sex, bad language or unnatural, ridiculous plots and sub-plots. What you will find is simple, clear language, a smooth presentation of the values and morals of the authoress' times, and very simple, human characters that worry about the only things that are really important in life, when you come right down to it.

    Louisa May Alcott's books should be the first books you introduce your child to--because the world (and the people in it) still need the values she writes about so naturally, and you'd be hard pressed to find those values in any of the "modern" children's books on the market. And for adults--why not take a trip back into your childhood and enjoy a simple, well written book again?

  • I read most of Louisa May Alcott's books when I was young and loved them. I recently re-read "Rose in Bloom" and found it charming. This, of course, is the sequel to "Eight Cousin" and tells us what happened to Rose and her cousins when they grow up.
    Yes, the book is strongly moralistic and it's supposed to be. Remember, it's written for children and teens and it's supposed to be instructional. What lifts it from being some kind of religious tract is the lovely story of Rose and her family.
    Unfortunately, I suspect that this book, like so many others, will gradually disappear. Paragraphs aren't supposed to be more than a couple of sentences. Morality is out; dystopia is in; and, if the pace isn't breathtaking, the book's a dud. Like other parents, I wanted to share books I loved with my children. I had success with some books, but, unfortunately Louisa May Alcott was a step too far.
    In the meantime, though, thanks to Chios Classics and other publishers who are re-printing these classics and making them available on Kindle. Us oldsters remember them fondly.

  • This Kindle version of the book unhappily has no illustrations, and suffers from the loss of all the em-dashes and semicolons, which turns quite a few of the sentences into punctuation puzzles to solve. However, it doesn't seem to have many misspellings or lost text, and you can't argue with the price.

    As for the content itself, I loved this book as a child, but hadn't read it in decades. I was pleasantly surprised to find that the story still holds up: in fact, I had trouble putting it down, and looked forward to getting back to it each evening. There is one chapter (about "sensational" fiction) that is really just too preachy (especially given Alcott's own history as a writer of thrillers), but most of the little lessons woven throughout the story are softened enough with humor and humanity that they go down pretty easily, in my opinion. Although the book presents an idealized world that never really existed, the characters are so distinctive and believable that you can't help but get caught up in their joys and troubles. Alcott's belief in altruism for its own sake does lend a heartfelt glow to the pages, if you have any aspirations toward altruism. And, grown-up as I am, reading the book did make me want to romp about outside the way the children do, and take a few of the lessons for my own use (though I just can't get behind the one about cold baths).

    Although Alcott can seem a bit too earnest and do-gooding for modern children, it's useful to remember that some of what the book advocates was considered radical in its day, such as the idea that the heroine, Rose, should understand her own finances, study human anatomy, and prepare herself to make her own decisions about her life and status as an heiress. The book also champions the work of housewives in a way that can be unusual even today.

    I was a bit worried about how I would feel when Rose meets up with two minor Chinese characters, but the scene was actually less racist than I had remembered. Though a few comments about things like "yellow" skin would not be acceptable today, and one of the characters is perhaps treated a bit too comically, for the time, Alcott held a remarkably modern view of race relations. She shows in a later book that she has no problem with a Chinese person marrying a white person, which is far beyond what her contemporary Anthony Trollope could conceive, though his writing is more modern than hers in most other respects.

    Alcott's writing style is pretty conversational, and I believe it's simple and straightforward enough that most older children will have little trouble understanding the language, though the book was published nearly 140 years ago.