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ePub Bloodfever (Young Bond) download

by Charles Higson

ePub Bloodfever (Young Bond) download
Author:
Charles Higson
ISBN13:
978-0141806624
ISBN:
0141806621
Language:
Publisher:
Puffin Audio; Abridged edition edition (January 1, 2006)
Category:
ePub file:
1909 kb
Fb2 file:
1887 kb
Other formats:
azw doc mobi lit
Rating:
4.4
Votes:
473

2006) (The second book in the Young Bond series) A novel by Charlie Higson

2006) (The second book in the Young Bond series) A novel by Charlie Higson. Following his adventures in the Scottish Highlands, James Bond is back at Eton, where he has joined the risk-taking Danger Society. Summer vacation is on the horizon and James is looking forward to the school trip to the beautiful Italian island of Sardinia, and the opportunity to spend some time with his reclusive cousin Victor.

Похожие книги: Young Bond: Silverfin. The Young Bond Series, Book Two: Blood Fever (A James Bond Adventure, new cover). Following his adventures in the Scottish Highlands, yo. т 1161. The Young Bond Series, Book One: SilverFin (A James Bond Adventure, new cover). What does it take to become the greatest secret agent . т 1254. The Young Bond Series, Book Three: Double or Die (A James Bond Adventure). This is no ordinary we. т 1176. Young Bond: By Royal Command.

Bloodfever' is the second title in the 'Young Bond' series  . Frankly, I would love to see what Higson could do with a story in Bond's later years. Even still, his version of teenage 007 stories are incredible as they set the stage for what's to come.

Home Charlie Higson Young Bond, The Dead. Charlie Higson is a well-known writer of screenplays and novels, and is the author of the phenomenally successful Young Bond series. Young bond the dead, . Young Bond, The Dead, . He is also a performer and co-creator of The Fast Show, Swiss Toni and Bellamy’s People. Charlie is a big fan of horror films and is hoping to give a great many young people sleepless nights with this series. Books by Charlie Higson.

Listen to books in audio format. Before the boy became the man. Meet Bond. Something is in the water at Loch Silverfin. Sam et son allié, Le Kid, ont survécu.

Young Bond: SilverFin, by Charlie Higson is an action-packed look back to the early days of James Bond. SilverFin by Charlie Higson puts the pleasure in pleasure reading. It is one of the most enjoyable books I have ever read. I stayed up very late on many school nights reading it because I couldn't put it down.

Press Release SilverFin, Charlie Higson’s first Young Bond novel published in January 2005, was one of the most talked about children’s books of the year, described by the Independent as ‘one of the publishing sensations of 2005’. In just 9 months the book has sold over 150,000 copies in the UK and is to being published in 17 other territories. Charlie Higson introduced a teenage James Bond to a whole new generation of readers and his second book Blood Fever, published in January 2006 (UK), has the all the deadly ingredients of an equally exciting bestseller.

The Young Bond series of novels was started by Charlie Higson and, between 2005 and 2009, five novels . My books are designed to fit in with what Fleming wrote and nothing else. I also didn't want to be influenced by any of the other books. for now my Bible is Fleming.

The Young Bond series of novels was started by Charlie Higson and, between 2005 and 2009, five novels and one short story were published. The first Young Bond novel, SilverFin was also adapted and released as a graphic novel on 2 October 2008 by Puffin Books. Comic book artist Kev Walker illustrated Higson's novel.

File note strictly confidential - authorised personnel only. This book contains James Bond' description: age 13; dark hair; blue eyes; tall for age; surprisingly strong; fluent in French, and good in German. The essential components are: a Mediterranean mystery, one kidnapped girl - feisty, blond, superfit Amy Goodenough, sister of James' best friend Mark, one villainous pirate - Zoltan Magyr, mysterious Latin-speaking men lurking near Eton, and, one fast car.
  • For this old 007 fan, Charlie Higson's first Young Bond novel, SilverFin, was a mixed bag. Clearly a book written for a preteen target audience, it too often seemed to mimic a Harry Potter adventure. I'm happy to report this is NOT the case with Young Bond Book 2: Blood Fever, which takes a confident quantum leap into maturity and gives Bond fans of all ages one of the very best James Bond novels yet written.

    The key difference seems to be that SilverFin was written as a children's book (which could still be enjoyed by adults), while Blood Fever appears to have been written with a more mature (even adult) readership in mind. This is a tougher, darker, much more violent book than SilverFin. It even includes a classic Bondian torture scene (but don't panic, parents, the torture is more about endurance than person-to-person sadism). But because Blood Fever chronicles the adventures of a 14 year old, it's still very much a novel young readers will find thrilling--even dangerous. This one may need to be smuggled beneath the sheets and read by flashlight--which is precisely where a James Bond book SHOULD be read. Ian Fleming would be proud.

    The villain in Blood Fever, Count Ugo Carnifex, is a true Bond baddie in the most classic sense, with a lair and scheme reflecting every inch of his megalomania. This is the best drawn Bond villain, book or film, we've encountered in some time. Secondary characters are also marvelously conceived, but it's the character of young Bond who stands head and shoulders above all others. The timid, apologetic youngster of SilverFin is long gone. Here, we have a teenage James with all the skills and swagger of Ian Fleming's secret agent. He coolly defies the villain, finds kinship with bandits, and gets visceral excitement by diving off high cliffs and driving fast cars. This Bond is no Harry Potter clone. This is the boy who will become 007 and who could kick the pixy dust out of any character in the Potter universe.

    One thing that is still not a part of the Young Bond universe, even in this more mature version, is sex. However, there is some simmering eroticism in how Ugo's decrepit sister leers at handsome young James, and clearly, the animalistic Vendetta has some carnal curiosity. Bond even delivers his first "hard kiss on the mouth" in Blood Fever. But that's as far as Higson takes it. Bond's resistance to his female admirers seems more rooted in chivalry than nervous preadolescence (as in SilverFin), and besides, danger is always too close for such "distractions."

    Some Bond fans have resisted the Young Bond series based on concept alone. Even I admitted that SilverFin wouldn't change the minds of the most entrenched fans. However, with Blood Fever, that resistance is now foolish. Bond fans are denying themselves a better Bond adventure than most of the recent James Bond films. There has been much talk lately about bringing Bond back to basics. Well, those basics are being practiced right here in the Young Bond series.

    So for you holdouts, my advice would be to take the plunge with Blood Fever. Young or old, this is James Bond at his very best!

  • For this old 007 fan, Charlie Higson's first Young Bond novel, SilverFin, was a mixed bag. Clearly a book written for a preteen target audience, it too often seemed to mimic a Harry Potter adventure. I'm happy to report this is NOT the case with Young Bond Book 2: Blood Fever, which takes a confident quantum leap into maturity and gives Bond fans of all ages one of the very best James Bond novels yet written.

    The key difference seems to be that SilverFin was written as a children's book (which could still be enjoyed by adults), while Blood Fever appears to have been written with a more mature (even adult) readership in mind. This is a tougher, darker, much more violent book than SilverFin. It even includes a classic Bondian torture scene (but don't panic, parents, the torture is more about endurance than person-to-person sadism). But because Blood Fever chronicles the adventures of a 14 year old, it's still very much a novel young readers will find thrilling--even dangerous. This one may need to be smuggled beneath the sheets and read by flashlight--which is precisely where a James Bond book SHOULD be read. Ian Fleming would be proud.

    The villain in Blood Fever, Count Ugo Carnifex, is a true Bond baddie in the most classic sense, with a lair and scheme reflecting every inch of his megalomania. This is the best drawn Bond villain, book or film, we've encountered in some time. Secondary characters are also marvelously conceived, but it's the character of young Bond who stands head and shoulders above all others. The timid, apologetic youngster of SilverFin is long gone. Here, we have a teenage James with all the skills and swagger of Ian Fleming's secret agent. He coolly defies the villain, finds kinship with bandits, and gets visceral excitement by diving off high cliffs and driving fast cars. This Bond is no Harry Potter clone. This is the boy who will become 007 and who could kick the pixy dust out of any character in the Potter universe.

    One thing that is still not a part of the Young Bond universe, even in this more mature version, is sex. However, there is some simmering eroticism in how Ugo's decrepit sister leers at handsome young James, and clearly, the animalistic Vendetta has some carnal curiosity. Bond even delivers his first "hard kiss on the mouth" in Blood Fever. But that's as far as Higson takes it. Bond's resistance to his female admirers seems more rooted in chivalry than nervous preadolescence (as in SilverFin), and besides, danger is always too close for such "distractions."

    Some Bond fans have resisted the Young Bond series based on concept alone. Even I admitted that SilverFin wouldn't change the minds of the most entrenched fans. However, with Blood Fever, that resistance is now foolish. Bond fans are denying themselves a better Bond adventure than most of the recent James Bond films. There has been much talk lately about bringing Bond back to basics. Well, those basics are being practiced right here in the Young Bond series.

    So for you holdouts, my advice would be to take the plunge with Blood Fever. Young or old, this is James Bond at his very best!

  • I have read every Bond book and have had fun reading the young Bond books. Higson does a good job of keeping classic Bond actions and story lines functioning as Fleming would have wanted them to. I am a purist so some of the verbiages and flip flopping from English and American references to speed and distance a the like. I know its being picky but this is a review and isn't that what they want? All in all very good and anyone who likes Bond will enjoy this book.

  • I'm a big James Bond fan, so I went into this with a bit of skepticism. Thinking that here is just someone trying to make money out of the Bond name. Boy was I wrong.
    Great fun, great read and the book really immerses you into the adventure.
    I highly recommend Blood Fever.
    I hope to meet the author someday.

  • Listening to any audio book read by Nathaniel Parker is always a joy. This Young Bond story turns out quite sinister including lots of killings of more or less innocent people (which to my knowledge is the tendency of the adult James Bond stories,too). The plot is altogether clever, compelling and surprising to the very end. The story starts with an idyllic scene in the Greek archipelago and gets soon to Eton College from where some boys and teachers James Bond including travel for the summer holiday to the island of Sardinia and get involved with art thieves, pirates and bandits. The course of events is directed by the local rich lunatic who naturally wants even more power over other people and helds as a prisoner the compulsory young beautiful English girl for James Bond to rescue.
    Nathaniel Parker as the reader makes this story even more live and exciting by his marvelous characterizations and strong empathizing with the interpretation.

  • I'm not much of a reader but this is an interesting book.