mostraligabue
» » Dragon's Son (Junior Library Guild)

ePub Dragon's Son (Junior Library Guild) download

by Sarah L. Thomson

ePub Dragon's Son (Junior Library Guild) download
Author:
Sarah L. Thomson
ISBN13:
978-0531303337
ISBN:
0531303330
Language:
Publisher:
Orchard Books; 1st Edition edition (May 1, 2001)
Category:
Subcategory:
Science Fiction & Fantasy
ePub file:
1754 kb
Fb2 file:
1409 kb
Other formats:
docx lit azw mbr
Rating:
4.7
Votes:
898

Series: Junior Library Guild. Hardcover: 148 pages. I do not know where to begin praising this book

Series: Junior Library Guild. I do not know where to begin praising this book. One indication is a list of the books I was reading and enjoying that I set aside once I picked up The Dragon's Son: The Lord of the Rings; The Ear, The Eye, and the Arm; Charlotte's Web; The Wind Singer; The Bridge to Terabithia. All enjoyable or important, but I could not seem to focus on them until I had finished The Dragon's Son.

Junior Library Guild. 26 December at 12:00 ·. Have you picked up any new nonfiction titles this year?

Город: Plain City, OhioПодписчиков: 9 ты. себе: A collection development service providi.

Город: Plain City, OhioПодписчиков: 9 ты. себе: A collection development service providing libraries with the best new-release books for children and young adults.

The Junior Literary Guild was a commercial book club devoted to juvenile literature that has become the contemporary Junior Library Guild. It was created in 1929 as one of the enterprises of the Literary Guild, which was an adult book club created in 1927 by Samuel W. Craig and Harold K. Guinzburg. Book clubs often marketed books to libraries as well, and by the 1950s the majority of the Junior Literary Guild's sales were to libraries

The Dragon's Son. (2001) A novel by Sarah L Thomson.

The Dragon's Son. Based on the Mabinogion, a collection of medieval Welsh tales, as well as later legends, tells of family members and servants important in the life of King Arthur, featuring Nimue, Morgan le Fay, Luned, and Mordred. Genre: Young Adult Fantasy.

The Dragon’s Son, a retelling of the King Arthur story, was a Junior Library Guild selection and a Bank Street College of Education Best Book .

The Dragon’s Son, a retelling of the King Arthur story, was a Junior Library Guild selection and a Bank Street College of Education Best Book of the Year. The Washington Post described The Manny, a comedy about a boy nanny, as having a plot worthy of Jane Austen.

Dragon’s Egg. by Sarah L. Thomson. To Julian-thanks for the idea. and to R. just thanks. Junior Library Guild. What others are saying. Collection by Hocutt-Ellington Memorial Library: Look What We've Just Added! . k. National Book Store, Book Cover Design, Book Design, Bestselling Author, Storytelling, Book Lists, New Books, Fiction, Novels. Hocutt-Ellington Memorial Library: Look What We've Just Added! Junior Library Guild.

Based on the Mabinogion, a collection of medieval Welsh tales, as well as later legends, tells of family members and servants important in the life of King Arthur, featuring Nimue, Morgan le Fay, Luned, and Mordred.
  • I do not know where to begin praising this book. One indication is a list of the books I was reading and enjoying that I set aside once I picked up The Dragon's Son: The Lord of the Rings; The Ear, The Eye, and the Arm; Charlotte's Web; The Wind Singer; The Bridge to Terabithia. All enjoyable or important, but I could not seem to focus on them until I had finished The Dragon's Son. The book does a spectacular job of explaining the motivations behind characters' actions, and it creates characters whom you never want to let go of and whose stories stay with you for days after reading the book. Thomson has a deep, humanistic sympathy for all of the four complex, damaged characters who serve as narrator for the book in turns. She is able to make you ache for the characters and their plights, even as they make terrible choices and unleash evil and havoc. [Spoiler ahead.] When Medraud's lover asks him how many people he is willing to kill to get his father to notice him, a whole life that hasn't been explored elsewhere springs into being. It makes other versions' renderings of these characters seem so naïve and uninteresting. [End spoiler.] The book brims with striking images. The battle scenes are particularly well-choreographed, exciting, and always clear. Geographical and historical detail are never ladled on, but glanced tastefully and tantalizingly in passing (J.R.R. Tolkien could have learned something from this book). There is a perfect balance in the time spent on describing physical things and settings against the time spent on describing characters' inner thoughts. The book is studded with examples of incisive turns of phrase, from a description of a handsome bard's crooked, disarming smile, to a description of a frown, like that of a priest at a Midsummer festival. And all of it achieved not through gussied language, but through simple, athletic prose. A real achievement. Also, the book's structure is quite skillful. It is told in four interlocking stories, with main characters glimpsing each other as side characters in multiple refractions. The effect is a wonderful feeling of non-linearity and involvement in the dynamic lives of these characters. You feel like you're ducking in and out of rooms in a bustling house, and peering into rooms through front-doors, then through peep-holes. Couple other things that make this book unique. First, it is one of the rare books that manages to depict lovers convincingly. You are never told that a character is sexy or alluring or charismatic, you're given vivid examples that arouse the reaction. Second, the book's feminism is subtlely and maturely incorporated. The book operates on a personal level, then on a political level, and never feels polemical or revisionist or didactic. I realize now that I've written this reader review for adult readers, although this is marketed as children's lit. For parents, educators, or kids, let me just say that any kid who likes Greek mythology (and all the neatest kids in every generation in every country all love Greek mythology), will like The Dragon's Son. It has exciting plot, it has really interesting characters, it has thrilling battles. And it also has a good deal of heart and guts to it that make it transcend mere entertainment. I would say that Megan Whalen Turner's The Thief and The Queen of Attolia and Philip Pullman's The Golden Compass are its closest analogs and peers, and that's meant as very high praise. Highly recommended to all intelligent readers.
    Also recommended: The Thief, Megan Whalen Turner The Queen of Attolia, Megan Whalen Turner The Golden Compass, Philip Pullman

  • Not for children

    "[The Dog's] paws had been hacked off at the first joint. Someone had cut its feet off while it was alive and left it to crawl away and bleed to death slowly, alone." Page 14. These words would disturb a child or an animal lover. The writer didn't need to go that far.
    "Who would do that?" "Saxon raiders ... or Irish slavers, or Picts" page 14. Is the author trying to stir old hatreds between peoples?
    "He killed him unarmed, in our marriage bed. And he had me in his blood." Page 24. I would not want to explain this to a child or even a teenager.
    "Even as I drew the blade across his throat, all I thought of was, enough." Page 39. Murder is treated as justifiable and no big deal, no remorse.
    Then follow many stories of siblings mistreating each other: reality, but not good example.
    That said, for adults it is an enjoyable book to read.

  • As someone who has studied and read Arthurian Legend quite a bit, I thought that I could no longer be surprised by any new retelling of the tale. This book proved me wrong! By telling the tale through the points of view of secondary characters like Nimue and long time antagonists like Medraud (Mordred), Thomson weaves an exciting new version of a famaliar story. However, my favorite part was her choice to include two fascinating characters that were dropped from the Arthurian Tales most people are famaliar with today and buried for years in Welsh Lore. These two are Luned, a faithful lady in waiting to Morgan Le Fay's also forgotten sister, Elen, and Gwenhwyfach, Gwenhywfar's crafty, but abused sister. I thoroughly enjoyed reading about these two characters who added whole new dimensions to the story. I can't recommend this book enough to fans of the Arthurian legend looking for a twist or just anyone looking for an entertaining tale.

  • As everyone else had said, this book is fantastic. It is *extremely* difficult to find any modern fiction depicting Gwenhwyfar's sister Gwenhwyfach and I had my doubts when I saw this book. But, she is depicted wonderfully and fully and one really gets a good idea of what sort of character we're actually missing out on.

    This was everything i expected it to be and far more than I could have hoped for. All of the character's voices are heard and anyone with a vague interest in the original Welsh tellings of Arthur will be veyr happy with this book. The stories are also very well self contained and anyone with an inkling of knowledge about the legends will be able to follow even if the stories are read out of order.

    Medraud's story was my favorite, as Gwenhwyfach was in it, but also interesting was Luned's, as I have never read about her before. I also loved the author's note and the help for the pronunciation of names, which can be quite difficult. I also liked the style, which was clear and precise and never ehavy or domineering like so many other Arthurian retellings. I wish the book had been much longer--I would have loved to see these stories expanded upon!

    Definitely a good buy for anyone looking to hear Gwenhwyfach's point of view!