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ePub Sun and Moon, Ice and Snow download

by Jessica Day George

ePub Sun and Moon, Ice and Snow download
Author:
Jessica Day George
ISBN13:
978-1599901091
ISBN:
1599901099
Language:
Publisher:
Bloomsbury USA Childrens; 1 edition (January 8, 2008)
Category:
Subcategory:
Science Fiction & Fantasy
ePub file:
1925 kb
Fb2 file:
1235 kb
Other formats:
lrf doc rtf mobi
Rating:
4.9
Votes:
299

Chapter 1. Long ago and far away in the land of ice and snow, there came a time when it seemed that winter would never en. There was nothing to do in the long nights when the sun never rose and the day never came but huddle together by the fire and dream of warmth.

Chapter 1. Long ago and far away in the land of ice and snow, there came a time when it seemed that winter would never end. The months when summer should have given the land respite were cold and damp, and the winter months were snow filled and colder still. The people said the cold had lasted a hundred years, and feared that it would last a hundred more. As a consequence, many children were born, and as food grew scarcer, the people grew even more desperate.

Start by marking Sun and Moon, Ice and Snow as Want to Read . What George does well is to take the original tale, stick with it practically to the letter, and then explain some of the moments that don't make as much sense out of context.

Start by marking Sun and Moon, Ice and Snow as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. For example, why would the troll princess love something as simple as a golden spindle or a golden carding comb? Well, trolls have an obsession with human objects and try to act as human as possible sometimes. That, in turn, reminded me of the polar bears in the book The Golden Compass, and so it goes.

From bestselling author Jessica Day George comes a rich new fantasy, based on a Norwegian fairy tale, set in a. .But the bear is not what he seems, nor is his castle, which is made of ice and inhabited by a silent staff of servants.

From bestselling author Jessica Day George comes a rich new fantasy, based on a Norwegian fairy tale, set in a land of eternal winter. Blessed-or cursed-with an ability to understand animals, the Lass (as she's known to her family) has always been seen as strange. And when an isbjorn (polar bear) seeks her out, and promises that her family will become rich if only the Lass will accompany him to his castle, she doesn't hesitate.

Jessica Day George takes the White Bear King's story and revamps i. Published 3 months ago. D. Nellikers

Jessica Day George takes the White Bear King's story and revamps it. If you're familiar with Dennis McKiernan's "Once Upon a Winter's Night", then you'll know what "Sun and Moon, Ice and Snow" is about. Nellikers.

Jessica Day George takes the White Bear King's story and revamps it. If you're familiar with Dennis McKiernan's . I found myself enjoying the easy read of George's book to McKiernan's version of the story and hope you, the next reader, will take a chance and read her book too.

Just like when she had deciphered the pillars in the great hall, she worked through luncheon and tea, poring over the markings ed, she took out her little.

Just like when she had deciphered the pillars in the great hall, she worked through luncheon and tea, poring over the markings ed, she took out her little sewing scissors and delicately snipped the threads that held the blue ribbons in place. Carefully lifting up the loosened blue ribbons, the dire message of the red grew all the more clear. There’s something strange here, she told Rollo

Blessed-or cursed-with an ability to understand animals, the Lass has always felt estranged from her family, who struggle to make a living in the windswept north.

Blessed-or cursed-with an ability to understand animals, the Lass has always felt estranged from her family, who struggle to make a living in the windswept north. So when an isbjorn (polar bear) seeks her out and promises that her family will be provided for if she accompanies him to his castle, she doesn’t hesitate. But the great white bear is not what he seems, nor is his castle.

But the bear is not what he seems, nor is his castle, which is made of ice and inhabited by a silent staff of servants

But the bear is not what he seems, nor is his castle, which is made of ice and inhabited by a silent staff of servants. Only a grueling journey on the backs of the four winds will reveal the truth: the bear is really a prince who's been enchanted by a troll queen, and the Lass must come up with a way to free him before he's forced to marry a troll princess. Kids Traditional Stories. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

Blessed―or cursed―with an ability to understand animals, the Lass (as she's known to her family) has always been an oddball. And when an isbjorn (polar bear) seeks her out, and promises that her family will become rich if only the Lass will accompany him to his castle, she doesn't hesitate. But the bear is not what he seems, nor is his castle, which is made of ice and inhabited by a silent staff of servents. Only a grueling journey on the backs of the four winds will reveal the truth: the bear is really a prince who's been enchanted by a troll queen, and the Lass must come up with a way to free him before he's forced to marry a troll princess.

  • Finally a beautiful book written with a fairy tale narration that wasn't laden with grammatical errors. There was one typo in the entire book that caught my attention, which is an easy mistake, but this review isn't about the editing of "Sun and Moon, Ice and Snow".

    Jessica Day George takes the White Bear King's story and revamps it. If you're familiar with Dennis McKiernan's "Once Upon a Winter's Night", then you'll know what "Sun and Moon, Ice and Snow" is about. However, if you've never come across the Norse fairy tale it's based on and love stories about princes, maidens, fauns, centaurs, gargoyles, and trolls then this is definitely it for you.

    The story involves a similar premise to "Beauty and the Beast", but slightly different. In this fairy tale, the white bear is not a vain prince punished because he lacks humility. Instead, he is the victim of this entire story. By day he is a great white polar bear and by night he is human. He was cursed by a troll princess to find a maiden to live with him for a year and a day; she must not look at his human form by night or he will become the troll princess' new husband. She must not run away because she fears him as a bear either.

    Quite the conundrum for a bear. We come to Jessica Day George's story with the introduction of a nameless fourth daughter in a family with several children. The mother disdains the birth of another "useless daughter" and refuses to name her as in George's story the custom dictates only the mother can name a child. She's come to be known as Lass with a very inquisitive nature and kind heart. Her older brother, Hans Peter, returns from traveling by sea and is undoubtedly very fond of his youngest sister. He teaches her to recognize shapes he whittles out of wood. Later we come to find out these symbols (images) are pieces of troll language.

    Throughout the story, lore and tradition take a front lead. The mother believes in it so completely that she pushes everyone to pursue their fates and bring wealth to the family. George introduces the mythological White Stag as an element to inspire a change in Lass' life. Avoiding unnecessary spoilers, it grants her a boon - a name. Her own name. Somehow during it all, she comes into a power to understand animals. This gives her a bit of fame and not long after she's widely known for being able to communicate with animals a white polar bear shows up. Typical to the lore, she is asked to spend a year and a day with him. George's following of the fairy tale is complete, but it's the way the author shares it with us that makes the tale wonderful and worth a read.

    George inspires readers to keep pace with her through beautiful literary flow. You can find yourself immersed in her words as you follow along with Lass on her journey to saving her brother, Hans Peter, and helping the white polar bear. I found myself enjoying the easy read of George's book to McKiernan's version of the story and hope you, the next reader, will take a chance and read her book too. There's a free sample copy of the first chapter available for download. She writes in third person, past tense, and revives the old traditional usage of a glossary at the end of her book (which I wasn't aware of until I finished! D'oh!) for those unfamiliar with some of the terms used.

  • Oh how I loved this retelling of a classic tale! I've always loved the original, and now I love this one too!

    Lass' mother wanted a boy, not another 'useless' girl. So she refused to name her and when the white bear came, she jumped at the chance to give up her youngest daughter. Needless to say, I really did not like Lass' mother. Her older brother, the white bear, and her puppy, however, I ended up falling immensely in love with! Plus, the Lass' willingness to go to help her family out was heartwarming. I also don't blame her for wanting to get away from her insane family (besides her kind and wonderful older brother that is).

    This retelling is well done with beautiful imagery and deep, strong characters. The ice castle felt almost real and I enjoyed even the servants dialogue and found that I would have liked to have learned more about them. I like that Jessica Day George was realistic enough to let rose get homesick and not just throw a baloney 'lived happily ever after even though no one did any work whatsoever' ending. The magic was...magical in a word! The way the events were laid out were believable and I truly did enjoy this story by Jessica.

    I do recommend this book to any age if you are a lover of fantasy, romance, mystery, and retellings of classic 'fairy' tales. If you love any one of those genre's I'm almost sure you'll love this adorable book!

  • Once in an endless winter, there was a girl with no name. But because she was good and kind and true and stubborn and selfless, and because she performed femininity well, she was given the power to talk to animals, and eventually the chance to rescue a prince.

    I really enjoyed this story -- it rolled along nicely and was full of cultural detail. I think it's lovely for the age group it is aimed at, and the adventure is exciting. I especially loved Hans Peter as the haunted older brother.
    ""It is a fine thing, to set your sights on crystal towers and golden thrones," Hans Peter said quietly. "But first you had better see what lurks within those towers, and what sits on those thrones. Every palace needs a foundation, Askeladden. Make sure that yours isn't of human bones." And with that, Hans Peter got to his feet, his every movement as slow and jerky as an old, old man's. The rest of the family watched in stunned silence as he made his way up the ladder and into the darkness of the loft."

    This is a really elegant reworking of the fairy tale, and I recommend it, with reservations.

    I was, perhaps irrationally, sort of creeped out by the stranger in her bed. If she tried to get out of bed and sleep on the couch, he would pick her up and carry her back. I seem to remember there is something like that in the story, but it just seemed so...something.
    "Without a word the stranger carried her to the bed and tucked her in. Then the visitor walked around to the other side, got in, and went to sleep, back turned to her."

    Read if: You have liked George's other richly detailed fairy tale reworkings, you like fairy-tale novels, you want some endless winter in your life.

    Skip if: You are looking for emotional development instead of adventure. Pika is essentially the same person all through the story.

    Also read: The Golden Compass: His Dark Materials, for another story of a girl and her isbjorn.